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3/23/2017

A study in Diabetes Care showed that type 1 diabetes patients with the presence of any major abnormalities on an electrocardiogram had a 2.5 times increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, compared with those with normal or no abnormal ECG or no major ECG abnormality. Researchers analyzed 1,306 adults and found that 11.9% of participants had CVD events, 148 of which were nonfatal and seven of which were fatal.

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Diabetes Care
3/23/2017

Israeli researchers found that individuals with insulin resistance experienced a more rapid decline in cognitive functions, including attention, executive function, memory and visual spatial processing. The findings in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease were based on 500 patients with or without diabetes, but with existing cardiovascular disease.

3/23/2017

Maternal type 1 diabetes was one of the autoimmune diseases associated with an increased risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children, according to a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Researchers used a cohort of 983,680 children in Danish national registries and also found a correlation between paternal history of type 1 diabetes and ADHD risk.

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ADHD
3/23/2017

Research showed food-insecure US adults were less likely to meet at least three of seven health metrics, such as diet, physical activity, cholesterol or blood pressure, compared with those who were food-secure. The study in JAMA Internal Medicine, which included almost 8,000 people, showed 57.7% were food secure, 15.1% were marginally food secure and 27.2% were food insecure.

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food insecurity, blood pressure
3/23/2017

A recent Association of American Medical Colleges report predicts that the US physician shortage will get worse and a deficit of between 40,800 and 104,900 doctors will occur by 2030. Shortages will affect primary care, surgical specialties and medical specialties including cardiology and infectious disease, but telemedicine, new drugs and other changes in the health care industry could mitigate the impact of those shortages, experts say.

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CBS News
3/23/2017

Drexel University researchers found that functional near-infrared spectroscopy allows noninvasive and objective measurements of hemodynamic response to noxious pain in the prefrontal cortex, and is more portable and more capable of withstanding motion, compared with other hemodynamic-based imaging techniques. The imaging technique, described in the journal Neurophotonics, may be helpful in assessing patients who can't remain still during PET scans and patients with reduced pain perception, as well as in studying spontaneous pain and conditions that may influence pain tolerance, researchers said.

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ScienceDaily
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Drexel University
3/22/2017

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a low-cost mobile device that uses a smartphone app to identify the presence of Zika, dengue and other mosquito-borne diseases in blood, saliva and urine samples. The device uses loop-mediated isothermal amplification that, with the aid of custom biochemical agents and DNA "primer" molecules, indicates traces of the virus when the sample is heated and molecules fluoresce.

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New Atlas
3/22/2017

The Government Accountability Office confirmed it will investigate the FDA's orphan drug program for potential abuses after three US senators requested the probe. The investigation, which is expected to begin in nine months, will include a request for a listing of drugs approved or denied orphan status by the FDA, an evaluation of whether reviews are consistent and an analysis of the FDA's ability to keep up with orphan drug applications.

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Kaiser Health News
3/22/2017

Health plans are increasingly providing beneficiaries with tools to help them manage their coverage and care as well as programs to promote wellness. Insurers have developed mobile apps that allow consumers to schedule doctor's appointments or check their coverage information; they've created comprehensive digital provider directories; and some plans have launched rewards programs to incentivize preventive care.

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AHIP blog
3/22/2017

The American Kennel Club's most popular dog breed rankings have been released, and Labradors snagged the top spot again thanks to their friendly nature and trainability, which AKC Vice President Gina DiNardo said makes them a good pet for nonexpert owners. After Labs, the rankings include: German shepherds, golden retrievers, bulldogs, beagles, French bulldogs, poodles, Rottweilers, Yorkshire terriers and boxers.

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ABC News
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American Kennel Club, Labradors