All Health Care News
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/28/2017

Researchers noted a 36% drop in hypoglycemic readings and a 39% reduction in the daily number of inpatients with two or more blood glucose values of 12.5 mmol/L or greater in the year following implementation of virtual glucose management services, according to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Researchers conducted a 36-month cross-sectional study involving adult inpatients who underwent point-of-care blood glucose testing and used the virtual service, which includes automated reports along with clinician review and notes that are incorporated into the EMRs.

More Summaries:
blood glucose
3/28/2017

Researchers found an increase in the use of medications for diabetic nephropathy in the US from 2010 to 2014, with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sulfonylureas among the most frequently used. The findings in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics revealed that angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were prescribed in most treatment visits, with medication use reaching 90% during certain periods.

3/28/2017

A study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has found a connection between the plasma fatty acid composition of children's blood and the risk of developing cardiometabolic disorders, including diabetes. The study noted a link between vegetable oil-based margarines and lower saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid content, as well as high polyunsaturated fatty acid content, in plasma fatty acid.

Full Story:
FoodNavigator
More Summaries:
diabetes
3/28/2017

Data from the National Study of Employers show the number of companies with parental leave benefits is increasing past 2012 levels, following a drop after the recession, but remains less than 85%. The survey, conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management and The Families and Work Institute, found a decrease in the number of employers allowing the use of flex time during the work day, but increased use of telework.

Full Story:
Employee Benefit News
3/28/2017

Parkinson's disease patients who got regular exercise totaling at least 150 minutes per week showed slower declines in mobility and health-related quality of life over two years, compared with those who did not exercise or who exercised less. The study in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease said exercise can be especially beneficial for patients with advanced disease.

Full Story:
PsychCentral.com
More Summaries:
Parkinson
3/28/2017

Data show people born in the generations following World War II reported getting arthritis at a younger age, which Canadian researchers said could be associated with increases in obesity. The study in Arthritis Care & Research showed severely obese people were 2.5 times more likely to have arthritis, compared with people at normal weight.

More Summaries:
World War II
3/28/2017

A study in Pediatrics found breastfeeding infants for at least six months reduced the risk they would be hyperactive as toddlers, when compared with not breastfeeding. Researchers said, however, breastfeeding was not associated with improved cognitive outcomes in children.

Full Story:
National Public Radio
3/28/2017

A study in JAMA Internal Medicine found the incidence of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection may be reduced if people stopped taking unnecessary gastric acid suppressants. Researchers said there was a 22.1% risk of recurrent CDI in patients on gastric acid suppressants, compared with a 17.3% risk for those who were not taking them.

3/28/2017

A study found higher levels of mindfulness among pregnant women at 22 weeks gestation were associated with better mood and less depression, along with a 12% lower risk of having an underweight baby. The study had pregnant women fill out questionnaires on mindfulness and mood at 22 and 32 weeks during pregnancy and at one week after birth.

Full Story:
MedicalDaily.com
More Summaries:
underweight
3/28/2017

Researchers examined 2004 to 2013 data involving 1,826 ambulance-treated asthma attacks among youths ages 5 to 18 in Houston and found that most cases were among blacks. The findings in the Journal of School Health also showed a twofold, threefold and fivefold higher likelihood of ambulance-treated asthma attacks in high-rate high schools, middle schools and elementary schools, respectively, compared with other school zones.