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2/21/2018

All-cause mortality risk for older men dropped 17% for each additional 30 minutes of light exercise, such as walking or gardening, performed each day, researchers reported in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Sporadic exercise reduced mortality risk by 41%, while exercising 10 minutes or more lowered the risk by 42%.

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Medical News Today
2/21/2018

Overweight or obese adults assigned to a healthy low-carbohydrate diet lost an average of 6.0 kg at one year, compared with 5.3 kg lost by those on a healthy low-fat diet, which was not a statistically significant difference, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers evaluated 609 adults with overweight or obesity, ages 18 to 50, and also found no association between genotype pattern or baseline insulin levels and weight loss.

2/21/2018

An analysis of billing records from over 3,000 US hospitals in 2014 revealed outpatient cancer treatment costs vary widely and were often two to six times higher than the Medicare allowable amount, according to a report from the American Journal of Managed Care. Pathology had the highest price markup ratio at 4.1:1, followed by radiology at 3.7:1 and radiation oncology at 3.6:1, and estimated cancer treatment expenses ranged from $50,000 to $500,000.

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HealthLeaders Media
2/21/2018

Booties can protect dogs' paws from irritating substances as well as hazards hidden beneath the snow, says veterinarian Amy O'Brien, but many dogs won't wear them. Dr. O'Brien says some dogs need more protection than others, but it generally takes about the same amount of time for dogs and people to get frostbite, and dogs of all types should be protected from extreme cold and have their exposure time limited.

2/21/2018

An 18-year-old caught at the California-Mexico border last year with a 6-week-old Bengal tiger was sentenced to six months in prison after pleading guilty to conspiracy to illegally import tigers. The cub, Moka, now lives at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park along with Rakan, an orphaned Sumatran tiger cub from Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, D.C.

2/21/2018

Ctenocephalides felis, or the domestic cat flea, may be developing resistance to commonly used insecticides, but until now, progress on a vaccine has been limited. Researchers recently used transcriptomics and proteomics data from C. felis to identify protective recombinant antigens, developed a subcutaneous vaccine and reported in Parasites & Vectors that the antigens could be used alone or in combination in vaccines to control cat fleas.

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American Veterinarian
2/21/2018

Canadian researchers conducted a Phase III randomized trial involving 461 adults with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes and found that those who received ertugliflozin 5mg/day or 15mg/day experienced a -0.9% and a -1% mean change in glycated A1C from baseline to week 52, respectively, compared with the placebo group. The findings in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism revealed that the ertugliflozin group also had reductions in fasting plasma glucose, systolic blood pressure and body weight.

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diabetes
2/21/2018

The Glooko Mobile Insulin Dosing System has been cleared by the FDA for long-acting insulin titration for type 2 diabetes patients after a feasibility study found that those who received personalized long-acting insulin dosage treatment plans experienced a drop in average blood glucose levels and an increase in the proportion of readings in-range. Fitted within an app, the system enables clinicians to create customized treatment plans and recommends insulin dose adjustments and analyzes fasting plasma glucose levels.

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FDA
2/21/2018

The ONC has recognized the National Committee for Quality Assurance eMeasure testing laboratory as an authorized testing lab, allowing it to test health IT products for the agency's Health IT Certification Program. NCQA's testing method for electronic clinical quality measures was approved as an alternative to the ONC's current testing procedure.

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EHR Intelligence
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ONC, NCQA
2/21/2018

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that the adoption of EHR systems did not reduce administrative costs, which may be attributed to differing price schedules and contracts between hospitals, health plans and payers. The study, which looked at billing at a North Carolina academic health care system, indicates that "significant investments in certified health information technology have not reduced high billing costs in the United States," researchers wrote.