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6/21/2018

The American Diabetes Association and the American Psychological Association will offer a two-part diabetes continuing education program for licensed mental health providers, who will also receive continuing education credits for the in-person and online training. "The goal is for [mental health providers] to understand the diagnosis, know what is involved in a patient's daily treatment regimen, and know the sorts of behaviors that will help," said Doug Tynan, director of the APA Center for Psychology and Health.

6/21/2018

A study in The Lancet showed that while the death rates from all causes, cancers, vascular causes, noncancer and nonvascular causes declined significantly among US adults with and without diabetes, those with diabetes had a significantly greater decrease in death rates for all causes and nonvascular, noncancer and vascular causes. Researchers analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality files from 1985 to 2015 and found that several noncancer and nonvascular causes of death, including chronic liver disease, influenza, pneumonia, sepsis and renal disease, were significantly higher among those with diabetes.

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Endocrinology Advisor
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diabetes, chronic liver disease
6/21/2018

A Canadian study in the Journal of Physiology showed that young obese adults who participated in a six-week exercise program experienced a reduction in the number of stem cells tied to inflammation.

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HealthDay News
6/21/2018

The prevalence of obesity among US adults was 38.9% and severe obesity was 7.6% from 2013 to 2016, researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings, based on 10,792 adults, revealed that men and women living in medium or small metropolitan statistical areas had an increased age-adjusted prevalence of obesity, compared with those living in large MSAs.

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Obesity
6/21/2018

Researchers analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey involving 43,000 Taiwanese adults without diabetes at baseline and found that regular and heavy drinkers and nondrinkers were at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes than social drinkers. The findings in Clinical Nutrition revealed the increased diabetes risk among regular and heavy drinkers and nondrinkers persisted after adjusting for comorbidities, demographics and health behaviors, compared with social drinkers.

6/21/2018

University of Florida investigators discovered the first confirmed case of Keystone infection in a human in a teenage boy who came to an urgent care clinic in Florida during the Zika virus epidemic in August 2016, as reported in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The Keystone virus is mosquito-borne and from a family of viruses that can cause encephalitis.

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Florida
6/21/2018

The Illinois Department of Public Health has informed the CDC that it confirmed the first human case of West Nile virus for this year in mid-May, earlier than in previous years. In 2017 Illinois reported 90 human cases of West Nile virus infections.

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The Associated Press
6/21/2018

Researchers in England found that the prevalence of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 dropped from 8.2% in 2010-2011 to 1.6% in 2016 among girls and women in the UK ages 16 to 18 and from 14% to 1.6% among those ages 19 to 21. Routine vaccination was introduced in 2008, and the rates of HPV types 31, 33 and 45 also declined in both age groups, according to the study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

6/21/2018

Research finds that when overweight or obese patients feel stigmatized by their physician it can cause health care avoidance, leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment of health issues. Registered dietitian Rebecca Scritchfield writes some physicians are moving away from focusing on body mass index and weighing patients, and one doctor suggests patients who want a weight-neutral approach to care should put their preference in writing.

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Rebecca Scritchfield
6/21/2018

SNMMI expressed support for updated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging guidance released by the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, which amends sections on collimators, CZT scanners and novel hardware and provides new sections on reduced count density reconstruction techniques, patient-centered MPI, SPECT myocardial blood flow quantification and stress-first/stress-only imaging. The recommendations, published in a nuclear cardiology journal, will help guide imaging best practices to improve patient management and outcomes, said Dr. Panithaya Chareonthaitawee, guideline co-author and president of the SNMMI Cardiovascular Council.

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PRWeb