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9/1/2015

A Congressional Budget Office analysis found that exempting pharmaceutical products from inter partes review, which the pharmaceutical industry is seeking, could delay the release of generic drugs and cost federal care programs $1.3 billion over 10 years. The procedure was enacted in 2012 to thwart patent trolls, and Matthew Eyles, executive vice president of policy and regulatory affairs at AHIP, called the IPR system "a critical consumer protection."

9/1/2015

Polish researchers found a sixfold increased risk of heart attack among women with diabetes who were younger than 45, regardless of whether they were obese or not, compared to those who didn't have the disease. The findings, presented at a meeting of the European Society of Cardiology, also revealed that smoking increased the risk of heart attack more in young women than older women.

9/1/2015

A U.S. study in The American Journal of Cardiology revealed that periodontal disease duration among individuals with type 1 diabetes may predict long-term progression of coronary artery calcium, but not in those without the disease. The findings, based on 1,021 patients with and without type 1 diabetes, showed the duration of periodontal disease was not significantly associated with baseline CAC prevalence.

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diabetes
9/1/2015

Type 1 diabetes patients who had nonalbuminuric chronic kidney disease were at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, according to a Finnish study in Diabetes Care. The findings, based on 3,809 patients with type 1 diabetes, showed no association between nonalbuminuric CKD and increased risk of albuminuria or end-stage renal disease.

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diabetes, renal disease, albuminuria
9/1/2015

Israeli researchers found fewer behavioral and emotional problems among teens with loving, close relationships with their grandparents, especially those who also had close relationships with their parents, compared with teens who had less attachment. The findings in the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry were based on 1,405 teens, ages 12 to 18.

9/1/2015

Food cravings may activate hard-wired neural connections in obese people in ways similar to what's observed in brains of drug addicts, according to a study presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Congress in Amsterdam. Functional MRI showed obese participants had strong connectivity between the reward-seeking dorsal caudate and the somatosensory cortex, the same brain changes associated with drug addiction. In contrast, normal-weight people had stronger connections between the decision-making orbitofrontal cortex and the ventral putamen.

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MedicalDaily.com
9/1/2015

The nonprofit group Mill City Grows runs an urban farming operation and eight mobile markets that deliver locally grown fresh produce to inner-city areas of Lowell, Mass., five days per week. Run by staff, students and volunteers, the initiative also features a community gardening program and education on food insecurity.

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nonprofit group, food insecurity
9/1/2015

If the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable's goal of increasing colorectal cancer screening to 80% by 2018 is achieved, data estimate that about 277,000 colorectal cancer cases and 203,000 deaths from the disease could be avoided. Researchers said an additional 24.4 million Americans would need to get tested to hit the 80% mark.

9/1/2015

A study published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology found that seniors with osteoarthritis who undergo knee or hip replacement surgery may experience a short-term spike in heart attack risk and a longer-term elevation of venous thromboembolism risk. The study looked at 40,000 patients, half of whom underwent joint replacement. The authors said that the mechanisms behind the increased risk are unclear, but that doctors and patients should talk through the risks associated with surgery, and future studies should look at ways of mitigating risks.

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Reuters
9/1/2015

Missouri is among 11 states that have laws or regulations requiring health care facilities to adopt safety initiatives aimed at preventing nurse injuries, and hospitals officials say they have made progress in preventing a new generation of nurses from developing debilitating conditions that force them to live with pain or leave the profession. Meanwhile, legislation in Florida would require hospitals to track injuries and create committees.