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9/4/2015

Half of type 2 diabetes patients who underwent weight-loss surgery maintained diabetes remission, compared to none of those who continued with a conventional drug therapy, according to a UK study in The Lancet. The findings, based on 53 obese patients with type 2 diabetes, also found those in the surgery group were less likely to have diabetes-related complications and had a reduced heart risk and lower blood glucose levels over five years than patients in the drug treatment group.

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diabetes, blood glucose
9/4/2015

A CDC report showed 31% of US children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were diagnosed before age 6 and almost 50% received their diagnosis before age 7. The findings, based on interviews of about 3,000 parents of children with ADHD and 115 parents of children with Tourette's syndrome, also revealed that more than 50% of the children were diagnosed by a general pediatrician or family doctor, while only 25% of those diagnosed before age 6 received their diagnosis from a psychiatrist.

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HealthDay News
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ADHD, CDC, Tourette's syndrome
9/4/2015

A CDC-led study published in the NCHS Data Brief shows that more US adults are undergoing total knee replacement, with the procedure becoming the leading inpatient surgery among adults age 45 and older in 2010. The average age of patients undergoing knee replacement was 66 in 2010, compared with 69 in 2000; procedure rates have nearly doubled among middle age and older Americans; and women are more likely to have the surgery than men. Experts said there has been a shift in how doctors and patients approach the deterioration of knees: They are increasingly likely to pursue surgery before joint pain becomes unbearable rather than waiting as long as possible.

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CDC
9/4/2015

UCB's specialty generic drug business, Kremers Urban Pharmaceuticals, will be acquired by Lannett in a deal worth $1.23 billion. The deal, which is expected to be completed later this year, will include Kremers Urban's 381,000-square-foot production site in Indiana, 18 generic drugs and 11 applications pending FDA approval.

9/4/2015

A federal judge has ordered the clerk of Rowan County, Ky., to jail for her refusal to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples or allow her deputies to do so. Kim Davis says authorizing same-sex marriages, upheld by the US Supreme Court in June, violates her religious beliefs. US District Court Judge David Bunning said her refusal violates her oath of office.

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BBC
9/4/2015

Not all cities are created equal when it comes to pets, according to a WalletHub study. The research ranks cities according to the cost of veterinary care and pet insurance, per-capita dog parks and pet-friendly businesses and more. Overall, Cincinnati is ranked as the best city for pet lovers.

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PropertyCasualty360
9/4/2015

Cattle welfare is poor when animals experience fatigued cattle syndrome, and a recent study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association suggests multiple factors besides beta agonist use contribute to the syndrome in cattle. The researchers concluded that cattle genetics, finish weight, handling and heat stress all play a role in fatigued cattle syndrome.

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FeedNavigator
9/4/2015

A 79-person study in Telemedicine and e-Health followed patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who used a telehealth-based application that allowed them to report symptoms and receive same-day guidance and prescriptions from clinicians. An algorithm notified nurses and physicians when patients' symptoms deviated relative to baseline, and patients who used the app fared better in terms of lung function, activity and symptom severity compared with a control group.

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COPD
9/4/2015

UK researchers found that spending an additional hour watching TV or surfing the Internet at age 14.5 reduced teens' exam scores by 9.3 points at age 16 and two extra hours led to 18 fewer points, according to a study in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. The findings, based on more than 800 14- and 15-year-olds, also showed students who did an extra hour of daily homework and reading scored an average of 23.1 more points than their peers.

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Reuters
9/4/2015

Researchers have developed a temporary tattoo that tracks blood flow rate and heart health by measuring changes in the user's temperature. The patch is also designed to measure the user's skin hydration, as well as activity in the skeletal muscles and the brain. And data collected by the patch can be translated into a report through a mobile application.

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InsideScience.org
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mobile application