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8/18/2017

EpiPen maker Mylan agreed to pay $465 million as part of a final settlement deal with the Justice Department, resolving claims that the firm overcharged the US government by misclassifying the epinephrine auto-injector as a generic product under Medicaid's Drug Rebate Program while it was being marketed and priced as a branded treatment. The settlement, which requires Mylan to reclassify EpiPen and pay rebates applicable to its new classification effective April 1, was criticized by several lawmakers who believe the settlement is too low.

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Reuters, The Hill
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Mylan, Mylan, Justice Department, Medicaid
8/18/2017

UK researchers found that 31.5%, 21.5% and 19% of children and teens who regularly skipped breakfast didn't meet the lower recommended intakes of iron, iodine and calcium, respectively, compared with only 4.4%, 3.3% and 2.9% of those who ate breakfast. The findings in the British Journal of Nutrition also showed that daily breakfast was missed by only 6.5% of youths ages 4 to 10, compared with almost 27% of those ages 11 to 18.

8/18/2017

White social workers who aim to follow the National Association of Social Workers' Code of Ethics should check in with minority clients in the wake of the Charlottesville, Va., violence and should take steps to educate themselves on the US white supremacist movement, writes social work professor Elspeth Slayter. She also recommends they speak out about their own views and examine how they may have benefited from white privilege.

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Social Work Helper
8/18/2017

A study in Diabetes Care found poorer medication adherence explained much of the gap between real-world and randomized controlled trial participants for changes in A1C following treatment with glucagonlike peptide-1 receptor agonists or DPP-IV inhibitors.

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diabetes
8/18/2017

CDC researchers found that more than 85% of adolescents ages 12 to 17 and 81% of young adults ages 18 to 24 who wear contact lenses reported at least one habit that may increase their odds of developing eye infections. The findings in the agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report also showed that failure to visit an eye doctor once a year and failure to replace lenses as prescribed were among the most prevalent risky behaviors reported by both teens and young adults.

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CDC, eye infections
8/18/2017

McGill University researchers found that biological markers of Alzheimer's disease were most apparent among older adults who had the most difficulty determining odors. The findings in the journal Neurology, based on data involving 274 at-risk individuals with an average age of 63, suggest that smell tests could be used as a cheaper alternative in monitoring Alzheimer's progression, but more studies are needed in tracking changes in odor identification in relation to disease progression, researchers said.

8/18/2017

A tool has been developed to help clinicians discuss spiritual well-being with cancer patients in palliative care, regardless of the patient's specific religious faith. A report in the European Journal of Cancer Care noted the tool has been validated in 14 countries and 10 languages.

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palliative care
8/18/2017

HHS has postponed until July 2018 the effective date of a new rule that would have reduced ceiling prices for medications purchased by hospitals under the 340B drug discount program, and would have given the agency the authority to fine drug manufacturers that intentionally overcharge a hospital. HHS said the decision to delay the rule, which was supposed to take effect in April, will give the agency more time to consider alternative and supplemental regulatory provisions.

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HHS
8/18/2017

US food manufacturers are making progress complying with an FDA order to replace partially hydrogenated oils, a key source of artificial trans fat, with healthier oils by June 2018. Registered dietitian Keri Gans says just because food is made with a healthier type of oil does not mean it is a healthy choice, so the diet rules about eating French fries still apply.

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Bloomberg
8/18/2017

Most people do not get enough eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which are long-chain omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and fish oils, said registered dietitian Christy Brissette. Research links consumption of these omega-3s with lower heart disease risks, and DHA is important in prenatal care for development of an infant's brain and eyes, Brissette said.

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fatty acids, Christy Brissette, EPA