Construction
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/17/2017

A Feb. 27 groundbreaking ceremony will kick off construction of a 14-acre, $200 million stadium project for the D.C. United soccer team. The Washington, D.C., Zoning Commission has provided final approval, and construction should wrap up in 2018.

2/17/2017

Tennis star Venus Williams just sold her Hamptons, N.Y., home for about $12 million. The 13,000-square-foot home has a rooftop tennis court that features layered rubber and is set into the attic.

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Venus Williams, $12 million, N.Y.
2/17/2017

A multibillion-dollar fertilizer plant in Indiana could break ground this year and take four years to build. Midwest Fertilizer is renegotiating an expired engineering, procurement and construction contract with Thyssenkrupp Industrial Solutions USA.

2/17/2017

A $1.9 billion ethylene plant and a $1.1 billion ethylene glycol plant being built in Louisiana will provide more than 3,000 construction jobs. Heavy equipment is arriving, and crews have been clearing the site, driving concrete piles, placing building foundations, installing underground piping and erecting a warehouse and maintenance building.

2/17/2017

Faraday Future halted construction late last year on its automobile manufacturing plant in Nevada, but the company plans to restart "as soon as possible." Officials have begun the competitive bidding process on the second phase.

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Las Vegas Sun
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Faraday Future, car company
2/17/2017

Public-private partnerships are being used to fund renovation projects at Austin, Texas's international airport and others around the country, and many experts believe P3s can be a model for improving older airports. President Trump and his pick for commerce secretary, Wilbur Ross, have expressed interest in using private investment as a tool to improve the nation's infrastructure.

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Wilbur Ross, President Trump
2/17/2017

Partisan politics have led to deterioration of the nation's infrastructure, and the failures at the Oroville Dam are the latest example, Barry Ritholtz writes. Government officials ignored warnings about problems at the dam for years, and political leaders need to understand that tax increases and user fees will be needed to improve the nation's aging infrastructure, he says.

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Bloomberg View
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Oroville Dam
2/17/2017

The Commonwealth Transportation Board has approved a plan to extend high-occupancy toll lanes on Interstate 95 near Washington, D.C., and convert high-occupancy lanes on Interstate 395 to toll lanes. The first part of the I-95 project, covering 2.2 miles, is expected to be completed in 2018, and the second part, covering 10 miles, should be finished in 2021.

2/17/2017

For years, visitors have enjoyed one of San Francisco's greatest tourist attractions for free by driving down curvy Lombard Street. Now the city is considering charging a fee and requiring a reservation for the opportunity because it says the street can no longer handle its 2 million annual visitors.

2/17/2017

The Brent Spence Bridge between Ohio and Kentucky is more than 50 years old and badly needs to be replaced, and the project is a top priority of the Trump administration's infrastructure plan, writes Kentucky state Rep. Adam Koenig. Koenig supports a plan to create a public-private partnership that would fund half of the $2.5 billion project, writing that it would be a "boon to the taxpayers whose dollars are normally spent without concern."