Construction
Top editor picks, summarized for you
9/2/2015

Twin Eagle has started construction at the 530-acre Permian Rail Park, a fracturing-sand rail facility in West Texas. The first phase of the multiphase project, due for completion early next year, involves installation of 33,000 feet of track. The second phase will add a loop track to support trains carrying oil.

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West Texas, Twin Eagle
9/2/2015

Officials in Los Angeles County are pushing forward with a plan to spend $2 billion to replace one detention facility and renovate another. The county wants to construct a new 3,885-bed facility focused on psychiatric treatment to replace the current downtown men's prison and renovate an unoccupied facility into 1,600-bed facility for women. County supervisors have signed off on the plan, but the sheriff says more beds are needed.

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Los Angeles County, $2 billion
9/2/2015

The fourth tower at the State Farm office campus in Richardson, Texas, has topped out. The project is part of the CityLine mixed-use development, which will create 6 million square feet of office space, more than 300,000 square feet of retail space and about 4,000 apartments.

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State Farm, retail space, Texas
9/2/2015

Two University of Denver professors argue that public-private partnerships can help solve the nation's infrastructure problems. They point to Boston's Big Dig and Denver International Airport as two public infrastructure projects that went massively over budget. On the other hand, a P3 interstate-widening project in Colorado was completed on budget. However, "to avoid disastrous outcomes, responsible parties must utilize risk analysis and risk management techniques and planners must recognize the need for rapid adaptation and avoid lock-in to a rigid plan," the authors write.

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Quartz
9/2/2015

The Brooklyn Bridge is undergoing major renovations worth $600 million, and the New York Department of Transportation is looking to do even more work on it. The agency has budgeted $18 million for the additional design and construction work, including "resetting/repointing granite stone facades and the rehabilitation of Manhattan-side masonry arches, all of which are priority infrastructure needs and not part of the current contract," according to a spokesman.

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Capital New York
9/2/2015

Attorney Jack Garson believes that contractors must work hard to avoid construction mistakes that can lead to unhappy customers or lawsuits. In this article, he offers five tips to follow to reduce error, such as performing due diligence and choosing the right insurance.

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The Huffington Post
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Jack Garson
9/2/2015

When the Natural History Building at the University of Illinois was built 100 years ago, concrete was a new building material. That old concrete is creating challenges for the contractor who is now renovating the building. Engineers believe concrete on the upper two floors was cured improperly and not reinforced, causing the floors to sag. That and other problems have increased the project's cost from $70 million to $76.4 million.

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University of Illinois
9/2/2015

Nearly 37% of New York's bridges are rated "deficient," and the state is encouraging students to go into engineering to help out. Engineers from the state's Department of Transportation are at the New York State Fair working with kids on bridge design and the relationship between concrete, steel and cost.

9/2/2015

Prospects for a manufacturing-led surge in US economic growth have faded as a key benchmark pointed to a sharp slowdown in factory activity. The Institute for Supply Management's manufacturing-activity index dropped from July's 52.7 to 51.1 in August. It was the slowest expansion for the industrial sector in more than two years.

9/2/2015

Construction spending in July reached its highest level since mid-2008, coming in at a seasonally adjusted rate of $1.08 trillion, according to the Commerce Department. During the past 12 months, construction spending has increased 13.7%. Government spending declined 1% in July, but spending increased on factory construction by 4.7% and on power plant construction by 2.1%.

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USA Today
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Commerce Department