Construction
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/7/2015

Concrete workers are back on the job at construction sites in New York City, including Hudson Yards, after a three-day strike. A breakdown in collective bargaining negotiations between a contractor trade group and a local carpenters union led to the walkout. Federal Judge Edgardo Ramos ordered the workers to return on Monday. Negotiations will continue.

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New York City, Hudson Yards
7/7/2015

More than 1,000 schools in Oregon are at risk in the event of an earthquake, but that will change with $300 million in bond funding dedicated to seismic upgrades of public buildings and other improvements. The funds are part of the state's capital construction budget of $1.2 billion.

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Oregon
7/7/2015

The Japan Society of Civil Engineers recently issued design and production standards for aluminum structures, and the country's aluminum industry hopes to see more use of its product in infrastructure work. The Japan Aluminium Association says that the product is more expensive than steel but notes that "repair work [is] easier, cheaper and faster as it requires less reinforcement in foundations, leading to lower maintenance cost."

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Reuters
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Japan
7/7/2015

About 1/3 of the people living in Japan's Tokyo prefecture live below sea level, much of the infrastructure is below ground, and flooding has always been a problem because there is too little soil, too much concrete and too many tall buildings. Flood protection measures have been taken but will likely not be enough given the changing climate, which includes "guerrilla rainstorms" and "super typhoons." The country is looking into warning systems and additional measures.

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The Guardian (London)
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Tokyo
7/7/2015

There have been 33 short-term extensions to fund the Highway Trust Fund, according to Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, who says "we need to break the cycle of these short-term extensions." He said Congress will need to figure it out because the "duct tape and chewing gum" solutions used in the past have been exhausted. Foxx also noted that funding needs to increase if only to maintain the nation's current infrastructure.

7/7/2015

A 3D robotic company, a construction firm and Autodesk are teaming up to build a 3D-printed bridge across a canal in Amsterdam. Multiaxis robots will melt metal and then form it into bridge segments per instructions from the software. The role of 3D printing in infrastructure projects is expanding, saving on labor and materials.

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Autodesk, Amsterdam
7/7/2015

Miller Construction, along with engineers and architects, used Revit to help design and build a 209,023-square-foot tilt-wall service center for BMWs and MINIs in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

7/7/2015

The technology behind building information modeling is dominated by giants in the software industry, but there is a niche that purpose-built tools serve quite well. Francis Sebastian offers his impressions of the Envisioneer Building Essentials application by Cadsoft and how it stacks up against competitors' products.

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Engineering.com
7/7/2015

Adding tire fibers to concrete allows the material to flex, which can provide more seismic safety than traditional concrete, according to researchers at the University of Sheffield and Imperial College London. The fibers also help control cracks and mean less energy is needed to produce the material.

7/7/2015

If you work with construction technology and feel a need to develop your professional skills, there is help available. Randall Newton explains four ways to enhance your skills even if management has no budget for you.

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Cadalyst.com

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