Construction
Top editor picks, summarized for you
2/9/2016

The Bjarke Ingels Group has designed a 65-story, 1,000-foot tower with retail and residential space that will be part of the Hudson Yards project in New York City. The project, being developed by Tishman Speyer, is called the Spire and will feature a vertical, terraced garden wrapped around the building. About $1 billion in investments has been secured, though the project is estimated to cost three times that much.

2/9/2016

Student housing will be demolished so Rush University Medical Center can build a $500 million outpatient facility and parking garage in Chicago. Plans are sketchy at the moment, but architects are being interviewed, and design work should start in the spring.

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Gazette (Chicago)
2/9/2016

"HVAC producers, working jointly with design professionals, are in the forefront of the war on climate change," writes Alex Carrick, chief economist for CanaData, part of Construction Market Data Group. The industry has been instrumental in helping to develop innovative plumbing, lighting, glazing and roofing products to increase sustainability, reduce water consumption and improve air quality.

2/9/2016

The water crisis in Flint, Mich., has brought the country's aging water infrastructure to the forefront. Many other cities across the US also have lead-lined pipes. ASCE estimates it could cost $1 trillion over a quarter of a century to replace the oldest pipes, including ones that aren't lead. "The stuff underground is just totally ignored," said Erik Olson of the Natural Resources Defense Council. "We're mostly living off the investment of our parents and grandparents for our drinking water supply."

2/9/2016

There has always been a tension between what architects design and what engineers say is possible. This article features 10 projects "prove that for every brilliant building designed by an architect, an engineer has provided a solid foundation," writes Paul Keskeys. The highlighted projects include the Sydney Opera House, the Canton Tower and the Queen Alia International Airport.

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Architizer.com
2/9/2016

A $520 million project to improve travel times and reduce accidents on North Carolina rail lines will close dozens of street-level crossings and replace some with bridges by 2017. It also will increase the number of trains on the line between Raleigh and Charlotte.

2/9/2016

The Department of Transportation announced says that 77 cities have applied to its $50 million Smart City challenge that seeks "ideas that leverage emerging technologies to solve traffic-related problems." Five finalists will be announced on March 12, and each will receive $100,000 to flesh out their proposals. The winner will be announced in June.

2/9/2016

The Federal Transit Administration aims to encourage the development of risk management and safety plans for public transportation agencies with its proposed Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan rule and National Public Transportation Safety Plan, says Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. FTA Acting Administrator Therese McMillan said that the "proposals are about setting safety performance criteria and targets, voluntary minimum safety standards and a means to communicate safety issues industrywide."

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RT&S online
2/9/2016

Augmented reality and virtual reality are turning heads and making headway in construction but remain limited by the fact that few computers are powerful enough to accommodate the technologies.

2/9/2016

Modular construction is increasingly seen as the answer to a cost squeeze in hospitality. The industry notes the advantages of speed, quality and practicality, building on success in other markets, including commercial, multifamily housing and retail.

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Hospitality Net