Engineering
Top editor picks, summarized for you
5/5/2016

Smart contact lenses aren't in our immediate future, but several tech companies are already expressing their vision of what such devices might do. And Sony may have the most ambitious plan to date with a patent for a lens that both records and stores images and video as controlled by a wearer's blinks.

Full Story:
Gizmag
More Summaries:
Sony
5/5/2016

Nanodelivery methods hold the promise of getting powerful cancer-fighting drugs precisely where they're needed. In a podcast recorded at ASME's 2016 NEMB Conference, Katherine Ferrara, a professor of biomedical engineering at University of California at Davis, explains how in vivo imaging can improve this process.

Full Story:
ASME.org
5/5/2016

A scaled-down version of the Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft is proposed by Bell Helicopter to replace the US Army's aging fleet of UH-60 medium-lift copters. The bid plays to the premium the Army places on speed in a vertical-lift craft. The V-280 Valor will be in competition with another unique design, a coaxial rigid-rotor helicopter from Sikorsky/Boeing. This article looks at how the Valor works.

Full Story:
PopularMechanics.com
More Summaries:
Army, US Army, Bell Helicopter, Valor
5/4/2016

Two fifth-year mechanical engineering students are managing the first all-female race team to enter the SAE Formula Hybrid competition at Dartmouth University. The Hot Wheelz team consists of 40 undergraduates from the Rochester Institute of Technology's Kate Gleason College of Engineering and marks the culmination of five years of gradual team building at RIT.

Full Story:
ASME.org
5/4/2016

The new All-Go bike from North Carolina-based M2S Bikes joins a growing list of electrically powered bicycles that are light and clean in design. The 33-pound All-Go has a carbon fiber frame and a 500-watt, midmounted power system that can reach 28 mph for as much as 30 miles of pedal-assisted biking.

Full Story:
Gizmag
5/3/2016

Many companies will be able to comply with the Occupational Health and Safety Administration's silica dust exposure rule just by using and maintaining their current equipment, writes Duane Craig. Furthermore, the rule will take into account best efforts on the part of employers as long as the controls listed in Table 1 of the rule are implemented properly. OSHA also acknowledged that "some day-to-day variability in silica exposure measurements may remain, despite an employer's conscientious application and maintenance of all feasible engineering and work practice controls."

5/3/2016

Working with optical fiber to create a sensor that can measure as little as 1 nanometer of force, Nikhil Gupta, an associate engineering professor at New York University, developed a new type of extensometer. The device can detect defects in materials at a much lower cost and can measure pressure in aircraft fuel tanks, eliminating the danger of electrical sensors. It also may find applications in the energy and biomedical industries.

Full Story:
ASME.org
5/3/2016

A group of students from the Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur has developed driverless electric shuttles that could reduce on-campus travel operating costs by between 40% and 60%. "The shuttle can be used 24/7 and in all weather conditions," according to the group. "No special rails or dedicated pathways are required for its operation. The vehicle is equipped with lasers, camera, radar and GPS. The shuttles rely on a prior 3D map of the environment. It uses this 3D map to localize itself and interpret road topography."

Full Story:
NewKerala.com (India)
5/2/2016

Four-story-high mechanical longshoremen act autonomously and swiftly to unload ships at a California port at about double the pace of their human counterparts. The zero-emission devices are also seen as a way to reduce the severe, diesel-generated pollution at California port facilities.

Full Story:
Bloomberg
5/2/2016

Japanese engineers are hoping to capture the energy of the slow but steady flow of the Kuroshio Current in the western North Pacific with inverted offshore turbines. The turbines, steadied by a float on top and a counterweight below, would operate at depths of more than 300 feet, isolating them from the effects of waves while leaving the surface unobstructed by the towering turbines that capture wind energy.

Full Story:
ASME.org
More Summaries:
Wind energy