Engineering
Top editor picks, summarized for you
8/28/2015

A trellis frame made from a special alloy and the important ability to quickly switch from a hard-tail configuration for climbing to full suspension for speed distinguish the Bees Bike made by Germany's Altinsoy Manufaktur. The nearly $4,000 mountain bike also provides an ideal fit for each rider with an integrated systems of mounts and bolts.

Full Story:
Gizmag
More Summaries:
Altinsoy Manufaktur
8/28/2015

Certain iron alloys heated to 760 degrees Celsius -- or 1,400 degrees Fahrenheit -- for 30 minutes and then cooled rapidly expand in volume, thus unseating a scientific principle in place since 1841 that states volume shouldn't change. The discovery by Harsh Deep Chopra, professor of mechanical engineering at Temple University, and Manfred Wuttig, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Maryland, holds potential in a number of applications, including development of compact and efficient magnetic actuators due to the non-Joulian magnets' negligible generation of wasteful heat during energy harvesting.

Full Story:
ASME.org
More Summaries:
Deep Chopra, Manfred Wuttig
8/28/2015

NASA has successfully 3D-printed a turbopump that can withstand the extreme stress of rocket thrust, and the pump has the added advantage of requiring 45% fewer parts. An engineer who worked on the project said 3D printing also cut development time to two years from the usual four years.

Full Story:
TechCrunch
More Summaries:
NASA, engineer
8/28/2015

Doctors should be able to better gauge how to repair bone fractures by using 3D models of the injuries instead of 2D and paper models. That's the hope of bioengineering students at the University of California at San Diego, who have created 3D models of actual ankle fractures as part of their first-year program.

Full Story:
PhysOrg.com
More Summaries:
University of California
8/28/2015

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $390,000 grant to a University of Akron professor to study 3D-printed biodegradable polymer scaffolds that could be used in craniofacial reconstruction. The scaffolds would be used as a framework on which new bone could grow to fix facial deformities caused by injury or birth defects. "What we're developing is the promise of a readily made and applied breakthrough medical solution that has life-changing potential for people who previously had no such option," said researcher Matthew Becker.

Full Story:
AZoM
8/28/2015

University of Illinois students Aadeel Akhtar, a doctoral student in neuroscience, and Patrick Slade, a senior in engineering, are co-founders of PSYONIC, a startup looking to manufacture prostheses that incorporate sensory feedback and pattern recognition at low cost. The prostheses will be produced using injection molding rather than 3D printing.

More Summaries:
PSYONIC, University of Illinois
8/27/2015

Medical staff can detect signs of shock with no need to take blood samples from the central internal jugular vein, according to research out of the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. Researchers say that clinicians can place an optical probe on the jugular vein with the help of ultrasound. In human studies, the probe provided continuous tissue blood oxygen saturation readings that correlated to measurements taken from central internal jugular vein blood samples.

Full Story:
MedGadget.com
8/27/2015

Sleek, Ikea-like furniture delivered to your door is the goal of Campaign, a customizable furniture startup. The company goes one better on Ikea, in fact, with a couch and chair that can be assembled and taken down for transport multiple times quickly and with no tools, according to mechanical engineer and CEO Brad Sewell.

More Summaries:
mechanical engineer, Brad Sewell
8/27/2015

Engineering that utilizes 3D models is expected to be as transformative as the advent of computer-aided design in terms of how engineers go about their work. The need to maintain several engineering files will be eliminated, with one 3D CAD file containing all the necessary information. This model-based engineering environment in turn will facilitate collaboration and greatly reduce wasted effort.

Full Story:
ASME.org
8/27/2015

Researchers at the Technical University of Berlin in Germany and Korea University in Seoul, South Korea, have successfully used an electrode-filled cap to transmit commands from the cap's wearer to a robotic exoskeleton. The cap uses technology similar to electroencephalograms. Researchers are working to lessen the visual fatigue from the system and to reduce the exoskeleton's cost.

Full Story:
LiveScience.com