Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/23/2017

Although rainfall came up short of average, West Coast beach erosion in the winter of 2015-16 was by far the worst in 145 years, per the US Geological Survey. Erosion was 76% greater than normal despite El Nino.

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El Nino, U.S. Geological Survey
2/23/2017

Louisiana's coastline will remain a high priority for funding even as the state faces a budget crunch, Gov. John Bel Edwards pledged at a summit on coastal erosion. Edwards emphasized the attendant benefits of restoring wetlands and reviving industry in coastal areas.

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Gov. John Bel Edwards
2/23/2017

Large-scale attrition in the Naval Sea Systems Command's engineering directorate since 1990 will be addressed to prevent problems such as those experienced with ship classes including the littoral combat ship and the Zumwalt guided-missile destroyer, said Vice Adm. Tom Moore, commander of NAVSEA. The goal is a more hands-on engineering approach that provides more than a wish list of features that the Navy merely trusts industries to provide, Moore said.

2/23/2017

Dredged mud and sand may be just the ticket to address coastal erosion, Congress and the Army Corps of Engineers hope. The Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act calls for the Army Corps of Engineers to conduct 10 pilots to see if using sediment works.

2/23/2017

The tiny, complex helical structure of fibers in the shells of beetles, which are light but highly protective, is difficult to analyze but possibly the source of valuable clues that would allow the engineering of lighter and stronger materials for human use. Now Ruiguo Yang, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at the University of Nebraska, has achieved a deeper insight by slicing the nanoscale helical twists to test their mechanical properties under the view of an atomic microscope.

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ScienceDaily
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University of Nebraska
2/23/2017

The Coast Guard is calling for three heavy and three medium icebreakers as it faces a challenge from Russia in the Arctic. Currently, the service deploys only one heavy icebreaker and one medium in the region, while Russia has 40 of the vessels at its disposal.

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The Washington Times
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Coast Guard
2/23/2017

Trident II D5 missiles completed four successful test flights in launches from an Ohio-class submarine last week. The Follow-on Commander's Evaluation Test was designed as a proof of reliability, accuracy and overall performance under operationally representative conditions.

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MarineLink.com
2/23/2017

Huntington Ingalls Industries plans to hire 250 engineers and designers as it boosts its Virginia workforce by 3,000 this year. Huntington is the nation's largest military shipbuilder, with a current workforce of 20,000 in Virginia working on carriers and subs, in addition to a Mississippi yard that builds amphibious ships and destroyers along with Coast Guard cutters.

2/23/2017

The icebreaker USCGC Polar Sea, commissioned in 1977, will become a parts donor for its sister ship Polar Star after refurbishment was ruled too expensive. Now the plan is to keep Polar Star in service until a new class of icebreaker is available.

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USNI News
2/23/2017

Canada-based Gastops will be providing Dynamic Response Analysis, or DRA, a type of computer modeling, in the construction of the Coast Guard's new Offshore Patrol Cutter. Gastops, selected for the project by Eastern Shipbuilding Group, will use DRA to simulate the propulsion system integration of the vessel so ship performance can be predicted and analyzed.

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MarineLog.com
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Coast Guard