Engineering
Top editor picks, summarized for you
8/3/2015

A variety of exoskeletons are finding their way into the medical field, giving patients new mobility and capabilities. The recognized pioneer is the Hybrid Assisted Limb from Japan, with more than 150 now in use. The system is based on decades of work mapping human nerves to serve the suit's nerve-sensing system.

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The Daily Beast
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medical field
8/3/2015

The aerospace, medical and dental fields are likely to see the biggest growth and benefits from the continued boom in 3D printing over the next few years, according to Terry Wohlers, president of Wohlers Associates. In this ASME podcast Wohlers also discusses exciting possibilities in more consumer-driven sectors, including the auto industry.

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ASME.org
8/3/2015

The heads-up display in the F-35 Lightning II is incorporated in the pilots' helmets. That's just one of the innovations in the $400,000 customized headwear, which instantly gives the pilot all relevant information -- including speed, altitude and distance to target -- and even allows him to see virtually through the bottom of the plane.

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Defense News
7/31/2015

The deadliness of Ebola makes quick diagnosis imperative, but that has been difficult with viruses. Now, partly through the efforts of a mechanical engineering scientist, a group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed a quick detection method. It tests bodily fluid by passing it through a paper with antibodies, binding the fluid to nanoparticles that turn color if Ebola is present.

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ASME.org
7/31/2015

Schivo Group is including its 3D printing unit as it teams with Stratasys Direct Manufacturing. The combination with Stratasys' Global Manufacturing Network creates Schivo3D, which provides additive manufacturing that's certified for the medical device industry and can serve other industries such as aerospace and consumer products.

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3DPrint.com
7/31/2015

Public research in Spain lead to the creation of Marsi Bionics, a company that has created an exoskeleton prototype for children who are unable to walk. The size of the device can be adjusted as the child grows, and its gait adapted to each user. Marsi Bionics initiated a crowdfunding campaign to support additional development of the exoskeleton.

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RT.com (Russia)
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Spain
7/31/2015

In some situations gut instinct is a better indicator for decision-making than cool and careful analysis, research indicates. Tests confirm that somatic, or bodily, reactions can provide an earlier warning of risk than rational calculation. Heeding such signals can also help decision-makers avoid the problem of being stymied by too much information.

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Fast Company online
7/31/2015

Eight-year-old Zion Harvey is believed to be the youngest patient to undergo a double-hand transplant, which took place earlier this month at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Harvey, who lost his hands and feet to an infection years ago, wears leg prostheses.

7/30/2015

An 18-foot shark-shaped craft with a 260-horsepower supercharged engine can travel fast enough beneath the water's surface to spring above it, much like the real sea creature. The passenger-carrying Seabreacher craft is one of the main attractions at Water Adventure Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.

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Water Adventure Dubai
7/30/2015

The simultaneous localization and mapping, or SLAM, technology that enables robots to determine where they are can also be used to improve their recognition of objects, according to a research group led by John Leonard, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Object recognition for manipulating material things is expected to improve as researchers develop and integrate better computer vision and better software for both recognition and SLAM.

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Science 2.0

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