Engineering
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/26/2016

Common methods of inspecting and testing offshore pipelines all have their shortcomings, Chris Wilber, Houston-based pipeline services director with SGC Engineering, notes in an interview. And that's where drones can help, showing great potential for increased safety and lower costs, as well as providing greater consistency in inspection data for improved maintenance.

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Rigzone
7/26/2016

After 505 days, the 5,000-pound Solar Impulse 2 sunlight-powered aircraft has completed its global circumnavigation. The plane was able to fly day and night, thanks to 17,000 solar cells along it wings and four on-board lithium batteries.

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Wired.com, Gizmodo
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solar cells
7/26/2016

Failure in hydraulic systems can prove disastrous in terms of both safety and productivity even for those companies producing low-value commodity goods. Hunt Valve's Mickey Heestand lays out the basics of switching from a reactive to a proactive program.

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PlantServices.com
7/26/2016

People with gluten sensitivity now can quickly test the food on their plate for possible exposure. The device developed at MIT employs an assay that breaks down food samples and uses strips coated with antibodies that change color when exposed to gluten.

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ASME.org
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gluten sensitivity, MIT
7/25/2016

The old music technology of recording for vinyl has made an impressive comeback. But aging vinyl-pressing machinery is challenging production, opening the way for new solutions that may include 3D-printed records.

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ASME.org
7/22/2016

Photocatalysis using sunlight, an inexpensive catalyst and ordinary fescue grass harvested from a garden has produced hydrogen. The process developed by researchers at Wales' Cardiff University is unique in that it doesn't require the costly step of separating cellulose from the grass, making it a promising development for a more hydrogen-driven energy future.

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Gizmag
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Cardiff University
7/22/2016

Police seeking to unlock a dead crime victim's cellphone with fingerprint identification are getting some help from Anil Jain, a Michigan State University professor. He is using fingerprints of the victim that the police had on hand and coating them with a layer of metallic particles that will reproduce the conductivity of human skin and -- hopefully -- make them readable by the phone.

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Gizmodo
7/22/2016

The technologies of 3D printing and 3D imaging may one day give patients with often-devastating nerve damage a customized cure. Researchers at the University of Minnesota are creating a soft, 3D-printed scaffold for nerve regeneration that incorporates droplets of nerve growth factor.

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ASME.org
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University of Minnesota
7/21/2016

What could turn out to be the world's tallest timber skyscraper is being planned in the Netherlands. The 21-floor Haut project will feature cross-laminated timber and light, easy-to-assemble, prefabricated panels as well as energy-generating facades.

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Gizmag
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Netherlands
7/21/2016

Leadership certainly requires conventionally measured intelligence. But emotional intelligence may be of greater value, giving leaders the ability to link the emotive and rational centers in their brains and connect and empathize effectively with others, says executive coach Rita Allen.

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The Huffington Post
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Rita Allen