Advertising
Top editor picks, summarized for you
9/2/2015

Google on Tuesday unveiled a logo that features a sans-serif font and a slightly tilted "e." An animation posted by Google also shows a new "G" logo for use in applications, an updated microphone image for speech-recognition functions and four bouncing dots that serve as transitions between its looks. "Google's new logo ... tells us a lot about the future of branding in a world of smartphones, smartwatches, GIFs, and mobile video," writes Will Oremus.

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Popular Science, Slate
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Google
9/2/2015

Some of McDonald's most popular breakfast items will be available all day at stores in the US starting next month in an attempt to boost sales and respond to a popular customer request. "All-day breakfast is a significant business opportunity and a marketer's dream," said Daniel Delligatti, the chain's national advertising fund chairman.

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McDonald
9/2/2015

Foodies across the globe prefer Facebook for sharing recipes and other culinary-related content, with 81% saying they use the platform compared to Pinterest's 18%, according to agency Sopexa. Twitter drew 20% of respondents, and Instagram 17%. However, Instagram is more popular with American food lovers, 73% of whom peruse the site.

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Adweek
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Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest
9/2/2015

Desktop advertising spend is estimated to drop from $30.54 billion last year to $27.67 billion this year, while mobile ad spend will grow to $30.45 billion, taking the lead for the first time, per eMarketer. "[D]esktop's decline will likely come as a surprise, since it's now clear that mobile's growth is not purely additive for total digital spending," writes Steven Perlberg.

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Steven Perlberg
9/2/2015

Marriott International has removed one of its #itpaystobookdirect spots from YouTube after criticism from the American Society of Travel Agents. The ad shows a couple getting dodgy advice from a gas station attendant, and travel agents believed it was a dig at their profession. "[It] wasn't meant to disparage agents; the ad campaign was just meant to be playful," Marriott's Carmen Perez says.

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Skift
9/2/2015

The University of Phoenix is launching a creative review in which incumbent Arnold Worldwide is not taking part. The online university spent $96.5 million on measured media in 2014, according to Kantar, but it is also being investigated by the Federal Trade Commission for "deceptive marketing tactics."

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Adweek
9/2/2015

BBH Asia Pacific has created a spot for IKEA that features mini versions of the retailer's Metod range of modular kitchen fixtures being cooked up as ingredients in a frying pan. Shelves are sliced, drawers are pulled from a can, doors extracted from a jar, lightbulbs and screws are added and, with a quick stir, a kitchen is served.

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Adweek
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IKEA, Metod
9/2/2015

Agencies should stop dismissing millennials' requests for a better working life and realize that they are the main pool of talent and things will change through their influence, writes Jack Skeels of AgencyAgile. Shops that take the millennial approach into account are already transforming the agency model and experiencing success. "They're not about 'earning your stripes' for accolades. They're about inclusion, opportunity, recognition and reward," Skeels writes.

9/2/2015

Virgin America is promoting its new route from San Francisco to Hawaii's Maui and Oahu islands in a campaign called "Work Hard, Hawaii Hard" from agency of record Eleven. The campaign includes digital spots, out-of-home and custom content executions, and celebrates a chilled-out Hawaiian vibe and encourages "hardworking, entrepreneurial-minded business travelers" to relax.

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Virgin America
9/2/2015

The advertising industry "enjoys self-flagellation," but it also helps to recognize that a working life spent on creative endeavors still beats most people's professional careers, writes Edward Boches, a Boston University professor of advertising. "[W]e can find purpose in our work," he writes. "We can create welcome utility, improve people's lives, connect one another for the greater good, or just lighten up someone's day."

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Adweek