Enterprise IT
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/6/2015

China is a major cyberthreat to the United States and is "trying to hack into everything that doesn't move in America," Hillary Clinton said recently. The Democratic presidential hopeful made the comments during a recent campaign event in New Hampshire, the latest in a series of verbal lashings directed at Chinese cybersecurity policy from candidates in both parties.

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Time.com
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Hillary Clinton
7/6/2015

HTC reported a net loss of $261 million in the second quarter, ending a streak of four quarters of slight net profits. Revenues fell by nearly half compared with the same period a year ago, and the Taiwanese phone-maker closed some production lines.

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HTC
7/6/2015

MasterCard is looking to eliminate the need for passwords by working on an application that would enable consumers to authenticate online transactions by scanning their face. The scan process involves blinking to eliminate the risk of thieves using photographs. The company is also working on voice recognition and heartbeat technology as alternative identity verification methods.

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India Today, Tech Times
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MasterCard
7/6/2015

Vendors that sell products to the U.S. Department of Defense are employing fewer protections against cyberattacks than the average retailer, a BitSight Technologies ranking indicates. The company recently polled several sectors and found that defense contractors scored an average of 650 on a 900-point scale for cyber-readiness, compared to 710 for financial institutions and 670 for retailers.

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NextGov
7/6/2015

Making small improvements to your workplace habits can over time have a dramatic effect on productivity, writes Sandhya Venkatachalam. Regular sleep, scheduled breaks, the elimination of distractions and using lists to prioritize tasks can each help. "Almost every habit is the result of small decisions over time. Very small improvements can lead to big success," she writes.

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Fortune
7/6/2015

The financial sector needs to do more to bolster its cybersecurity profile, including training auditors to recognize weaknesses and provide advice on closing vulnerabilities, a U.S. Government Accountability Office report says. The GAO also found that many bank examiners have no IT experience and are failing to compile threat information from banks.

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MarketWatch, Reuters
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GAO
7/6/2015

The regulations governing business-to-business data security are less stringent than those involving consumers, which means it's more important for companies to do their homework on the vendors they plan to use. Legal experts recommend addressing data security and privacy matters during the contract process and establish a process for resolving grievances.

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New York Law Journal
7/6/2015

As cities become smarter and more connected, they are also becoming more vulnerable, experts say. Cesar Cerrudo of IOActive says the growth of digitally connected infrastructure has increased the risk of hackers infiltrating the networks that power smart buildings and disrupting everything from energy management to waste disposal.

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Dark Reading
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Cesar Cerrudo, IOActive
7/6/2015

The federal government's need for cybersecurity experts has never been greater following the recent breaches of the Office of Personnel Management's data, revealing security gaps in the nation's infrastructure, Jonathan Halpern writes. Private contracts and new laws, including the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity Workforce Recruitment and Retention Act and the Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act of 2015, will help the government attract top talent and establish cyberdefense positions to prevent further attacks, Halpern writes.

7/6/2015

The growth of the Internet of Things and privacy compliance are among the top issues for businesses this year, Barclay Ballard writes. Businesses need strategies to secure wireless networks and protect data as more devices become connected and more data is shared and stored, Ballard writes.

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