4/19/2012

Two new studies, published in Social Science and Medicine and The American Journal of Preventive Medicine, contradict prevailing wisdom about poor urban neighborhoods with high obesity rates, finding plentiful food choices. "It is always easy to advocate for more grocery stores," said Kelly D. Brownell, director of Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, who was not involved in the research. "But if you are looking for what you hope will change obesity, healthy food access is probably just wishful thinking."

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