Researchers using thermal imaging have found that the facial temperature of some bats infected with rabies decreases by more than 4 degrees Celsius within 21 days of infection, marking the first time a test has been able to detect evidence of rabies in a live animal. The researchers hope the test, once it is refined, can be used to detect infected bats in wild colonies to help contain the deadly disease and prevent its spread to other species, including humans.

Related Summaries