As more Chicago-area school districts invest in technology and transition to electronic textbooks, Sue Hebson, assistant superintendent for instruction and communications, warns that adopting electronic textbooks may not result in cost savings for districts replacing traditional textbooks. "And some people are frustrated with that because they don't understand that without the cost of paper and binding, why is this still expensive," she said. "In general what we've found is that e-texts are a little more reasonable when it comes to cost. And I don't know if that will (improve) with time."

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