Two economists at the University of Warwick in England have concluded that in areas where homeownership increases, the unemployment rate later rises sharply. The study argues that workers' sense of permanence in one location makes commutes longer as they change jobs but not homes. These areas have less-mobile workforces and are less hospitable to innovation and companies that would create jobs.

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