Data on 641 children showed that those who drank sugar-sweetened beverages during their midmorning break gained more weight and had higher skinfold thickness, waist-to-height ratio and fat mass over 18 months than did those who drank sugar-free substitutes. Researchers also found that children in the sugar-free group had smaller increases in BMI z scores, but reported similar satiety levels as those who consumed sugar-sweetened drinks. The findings were presented at the 20th European Congress on Obesity.

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