HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/19/2019

It's OK to take the first step in discussing issues related to your career with your superior, particularly if you want more challenging assignments and feedback, writes personal branding coach William Arruda. He also advises how to prepare a mentorship request and a case for a flexible schedule.

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Forbes
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William Arruda
9/19/2019

A Glassdoor study ranks the ten best-paying jobs in the US with health care positions securing five of the spots, including the top four, writes Catey Hill. Four IT-related positions also made the list.

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MarketWatch
9/19/2019

With women often responsible for more home and family tasks than men, they tend to suffer from work burnout more often, writes Stephanie Anderson Witmer. They can lift the burden of stress by meeting with friends regularly, asking for help and avoiding the pressure to multitask.

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Exhale Lifestyle
9/18/2019

McKinsey has released a report outlining the issues dual-career couples face in balancing their personal and professional worlds. McKinsey identifies three ways companies can better support such couples, including developing policies and practices that let employees take on leadership roles without compromising their family priorities.

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Forbes
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McKinsey & Company
9/18/2019

To encourage employees to interact more, some companies have instituted "forced fun" activities to get employees out from behind their screens. One PR firm opted to forgo traditional happy hours and instead chose mid-week company retreats that focus on team-building activities that challenge employees and foster cooperation.

9/18/2019

You'll improve your chances of landing a management position if you demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to collaborate and build relationships, writes Kevin Dickinson. Read up on management best practices and volunteer to lead meetings, oversee the internship program or other tasks involving leadership.

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Kevin Dickinson
9/18/2019

Addressing your cover letter to "To Whom It May Concern" can turn off a hiring manager, and a little detective work can help you determine who is in charge of hiring, demonstrate your initiative, and show that you did your homework, write Shana Lebowitz and Allana Akhtar. Tips include scanning the job description for who the position reports to and requesting information from connections you have at the company.

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Business Insider
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Shana Lebowitz, Allana Akhtar
9/18/2019

We humanize our resumes when we replace cliches with a conversation that includes specifics about what inspires our work, writes Hilary Corna, founder of Human Processes Continuum. This information sets resumes apart from their generic counterparts and results in people finding the best culture fit.

9/18/2019

One way to build employees' trust in artificial intelligence is to create a code of ethics, writes Rob Scott, global lead for HR strategy and innovation at Presence of IT. "If you are using AI tools in HR, ensure you declare this to users and find ways to explain how the tools got to an answer," he writes.

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Inside HR (Australia)
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Rob Scott, AI
9/18/2019

Recruitment chatbots can find job candidates, process applicants quickly and make employers accessible around the clock. "More mature recruitment chatbots can complete full conversations with candidates, and in other cases, they can seamlessly schedule candidate interviews without needing human intervention," says Rhonda Davies of Software Advice.

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HR Technologist