HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/24/2019

Measure the effectiveness of your digital display ad for recruitment by counting not only direct clicks but also the number of times people visit the career site through search engines, writes Jeff Perry, advertising executive at Star Tribune Media. "Various sources, including Harvard Business School and comScore, tell us that display (banner) ads influence search," he writes.

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ERE Media
4/24/2019

It's easy for employers and health insurers to use data from digital health apps against employees, writes Andie Burjek. "If nobody pushes forward to seek change that could protect people's health privacy, then the future health care environment is not going to be a safe place for patients," she writes.

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Workforce
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Andie Burjek
4/24/2019

HR should use recruitment data to determine the time it takes to fill a job, the number of employees who refer others to openings, the cost of filling positions and the turnover rate, writes Stacy Pollack, a learning specialist. "Understanding the source where each candidate has entered the talent pipeline is important in carving out your recruitment strategy and allocating time and resources to different channels," she writes.

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Glassdoor
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Stacy Pollack
4/24/2019

Infosys has received a positive response to its Lex mobile learning platform, which offers relevant, engaging content that employees can access any time, Sarah Fister Gale writes. Users can search for categories or get training recommendations from the platform.

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Infosys, Sarah Fister Gale, Lex
4/23/2019

Two Google employees, Meredith Whittaker and Claire Stapleton, say they are victims of retaliation by the company for organizing a staff walkout last November. The women say their job roles were changed dramatically after the protest, but Google denies the events are connected, saying that job adjustments are routine order of business.

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Google
4/23/2019

Some argue feedback is constructive only when it focuses on our strengths, writes Meghan Moravcik Walbert. Research has found negative feedback significantly slows our ability to learn, while positive comments encourage us to build on our success.

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Lifehacker
4/23/2019

While his grandmother was asleep, five-year-old Iziah Hall in Wyoming, Mich. called 911 and asked the dispatcher to bring him McDonald's. The dispatcher contacted police officer Dan Patterson, who went to check on the boy and he even brought Iziah some food because "I figured hey I'm driving past McDonald's on my way there and I might as well get him something," said Patterson.

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McDonald, Dan Patterson
4/23/2019

Data from a survey by Total Brain shows that one-third of US adults age 18 to 54 say anxiety or depression cuts into their work productivity, a hardship for them and a cost to their employers, writes Louis Gagnon. Employers can help support workers dealing with issues by offering digital apps and access to screenings, and pointing the way to treatment.

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TLNT
4/23/2019

LinkedIn profiles reflect poorly on users when they fail to feature quality photos, career summaries, searchable keywords or invitations to connect, writes brand strategist Rachel Weingarten. Users are more approachable when they tone down self-promotion and post only positive comments about others.

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Ladders
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LinkedIn, Rachel Weingarten
4/23/2019

People who are in a rut at work might be reinvigorated by learning new skills in another department, writes Julianne Pepitone. Lateral moves often require patience as pay may decrease initially but new opportunities for advancement arise.

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Glassdoor
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Julianne Pepitone