Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/18/2019

Boston Celtics guard Kyrie Irving has apologized to teammates for recent comments about their play, and the incident led him to also call and apologize to former teammate LeBron James for resisting his leadership efforts while they played for the Cleveland Cavaliers. "You go and you say something publicly, and it ends up received in so many different ways, and you never know how fragile or what guys are going through when you say things like that," Irving said.

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ESPN, NBC Sports
1/18/2019

Joe Walsh, Steven Tyler, Jason Isbell and other musicians who have suffered from addiction talk about the sometimes frightening transition to sobriety and the sources of creativity and hope they've discovered. "I think part of the process for me of sobering up, and I don't know that I've ever put it this way before or really thought about it this way before, was using my work to connect with the world that I had always felt so isolated from," says Isbell.

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GQ
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Joe Walsh, Steven Tyler
1/18/2019

The effects of emotionally charged communication linger long after a message is delivered, writes David Nielson. He suggests considering the intended effect of a communication, taking a break and editing before sending and avoiding the visual crutch of bolding or underlining.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
1/18/2019

Vanguard Group founder John Bogle, who died this week, is being remembered for his popularization of simple, effective and low-fee index mutual fund investing, and stories are pouring in about how his advice helped people. Carmine Gallo praises Bogle for his creative use of words, including the echoing of Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" in arguing for a financial revolution.

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Vanguard
1/18/2019

Gillette's "The Best a Man Can Be" advertising campaign is drawing comparisons to Nike's Colin Kaepernick campaign, but whereas Nike sought to reaffirm the values of its customers, Gillette is asking its audience to become different, Josh Barro argues. "[B]rands do not enjoy the corrective moral authority that might be enjoyed by a church or a family or a group of community elders to tell people that they are failing to live by the right values and should change their ways," he writes.

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New York magazine
1/18/2019

Debating conflicting views is fine if the goal is to help the team become more productive, writes Shane Snow. To avoid emotional fallout, people should anchor their views with facts and receive the ideas of others with an open mind and respect, he writes.

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Shane Snow
1/18/2019

If fears of not measuring up to gym veterans are keeping you from working out, try bringing a friend or joining a class, writes Josh Ocampo. The right personal trainer can help you create a routine that supports your fitness goals, he writes.

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Lifehacker
1/18/2019

When talented people also listen, show empathy and build relationships, they're more likely to advance, says United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz. "You have to make yourself the kind of person that people are willing to come up to and provide advice," he says.

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Oscar Munoz, United Airlines, United
1/18/2019

Some airports offer VIP services to shield wealthy travelers from the more stressful aspects of air travel. Los Angeles International Airport offers a luxurious option with its Private Suite, a terminal that features fully equipped suites and a private security checkpoint.

1/18/2019

Why it matters: A county-by-county study released today found there is a correlation between the amounts of money pharmaceutical companies spent marketing painkillers to doctors and the number of opioid-related deaths in nearby counties. From a recap of the study by Wired:

"During the time period of the study, 2013 through 2015, the counties that reported more spending of ad money also had more doctors' prescriptions written and more overdoses from prescription painkillers. The association grew stronger as the amount of pharmaceutical ad money increased in each county."

It is important to note that correlation is not the same thing as causation. Plus, there are loads of pharmaceutical sales representatives who market prescription drugs responsibly and doctors who exercise extreme caution when prescribing them. But that being said, marketing works. If the US is serious about slowing the opioid epidemic, maybe more attention needs to be paid to how dollars are being spent at every point in the supply chain.

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painkillers