Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/18/2019

Leaders who are emotionally aware can meet challenging situations as an opportunity instead of falling into self-doubt, writes former FBI agent LaRae Quy. She notes that emotional intelligence can be learned, and she recommends reading good literature as one way to develop empathy.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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LaRae Quy, FBI
4/18/2019

The ability to empathize with people has declined this century, according to research by Sara Konrath, and empathy appears increasingly reserved for those with similar opinions and viewpoints. As an antidote, try thinking about empathy as a way to selfishly expand your worldview instead of turning away, argues Fritz Breithaupt in his book "The Dark Sides of Empathy."

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National Public Radio
4/18/2019

Sports leagues, gaming operators and betting companies are each hoping to benefit from the Supreme Court ruling that expands legal gambling. Among the challenges are disagreement over who controls the data generated by sporting events and the state-by-state regulatory structure of sports betting.

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Fortune
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Supreme Court
4/18/2019

Without trust, management teams won't be able to communicate effectively, and they also will be less successful, Art Petty writes. "Do the top managers trust each other enough to allow warts, hiccups, and opportunities for improvement to become visible?" he writes.

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Art Petty
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Art Petty
4/18/2019

Be critical or give praise, but don't mix both into the same conversation, writes executive coach Mari Carmen Pizarro. "When it's necessary for leaders to provide negative feedback -- and every leader will have to at some point in their careers -- I believe they need to prioritize directness over their need to be liked," Pizarro writes.

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Forbes
4/18/2019

When companies use artificial intelligence and other automated systems to take over repetitive tasks, it will free up humans to develop "superjobs" that involve problem solving, communication, data analysis and customer service, according to this Deloitte analysis. "The challenge before organizations now is to execute this reinvention in a manner that leads to positive results for themselves, their workers, and the economy and society as a whole," researchers write.

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Deloitte Insights
4/18/2019

Robotics, artificial intelligence and other technologies are meant to augment our abilities in specific ways, much like how squirrels are better than humans at storing nuts and finding them months later, argues Maurice Conti, chief innovation officer for Telefonica's Alpha unit. "Successful organizations in the future will figure out how to partner robots and humans to achieve things that neither can do by themselves," he argues.

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Telefonica
4/18/2019

Rebecca Sealfon won the Scripps National Spelling Bee in 1997, and she writes about the long road to victory. This year's event will be held in May in Washington, D.C.

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Smithsonian
4/17/2019

Alibaba founder Jack Ma was criticized for his defense of the "996" work schedule -- 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week -- although search firm CEO Jack Kelly notes a kernel of truth in the idea of self-development beyond the day to day. "You don't have to spend all of those hours literally working at your desk, but rather putting work into yourself -- whether that means reading a self-help book, attending networking events, going to the gym or meditating to clear your mind," Kelly argues.

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Jack Ma, Alibaba
4/17/2019

Outgoing Best Buy CEO Hubert Joly took over a company in turmoil and has made stores into an asset through price matching online retailers, introducing brand-focused ministores and improving customer service and support. "We want to go beyond just selling products through transactions to selling solutions and building relationships," Joly said in 2018.

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CNN
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Hubert Joly