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4/24/2019

Leaders need to shed their old identities, learn to nurture the talents of others and be willing to do necessary administrative tasks when moving from sales to management, says Harvard University Business School lecturer Frank Cespedes. "It's all about the difference between learning to take care of yourself and learning to take care of others, from being an individual contributor in sales to being a manager who gets things done through other people," he notes.

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Frank Cespedes
4/24/2019

Leaders can overcome personal development plateaus by seeking out and forming networks with their peers to learn new tactics and strategies, writes James Millar of SkyBridge Associates. He outlines five factors that keep executives from connecting with one another, including time constraints and low expectations.

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ThoughtLeaders
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James Millar
4/24/2019

Companies can improve the customer experience by going through their own customer process to spot problems and by questioning why they do things the way they do, writes Dave Fish of CuriosityCX. Executives should also spend time contemplating problems to ensure the solutions they propose address the real sticking point, he notes.

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CustomerThink
4/24/2019

Esther Wojcicki says the principles she used when raising three daughters who achieved business success -- YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, 23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki and pediatrics professor Janet Wojcicki -- are also useful for developing ethical, productive leaders. Her recently published book details a philosophy captured by the acronym TRICK, which stands for trust, respect, independence, collaboration, and kindness.

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Fortune
4/24/2019

Jell-O may primarily beckon childhood memories at this point in history, but gelatin-based desserts were seen as status symbols in the early 14th century. "The innovation of the 1990s pre-packaged, ready-to-eat Jell-O cups was the final blow to gelatin's place in culinary history," says food historian Christina Ward.

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Atlas Obscura
4/24/2019

Disappointment results from unrealistic expectations about what life will be like once a career milestone is reached, writes performance strategist Laura Garnett. Every career move involves obstacles and setbacks but is worth pursuing if it involves challenging, purposeful work you enjoy doing.

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Inc. online
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Laura Garnett
4/24/2019

Career coach Kathy Caprino analyzes the source of career uncertainty and discontent at three life stages, including middle age and first-time motherhood. She outlines five steps to help people understand their value and move toward a more stable, engaging future.

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Forbes
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Kathy Caprino
4/24/2019

Job seekers will no longer have access to LinkedIn's Job Search app starting next month. The app's features and each user's saved information will transfer to LinkedIn's main app.

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CNET
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LinkedIn
4/24/2019

A study finds several industries offer the most job security due to rates of staff growth and employee longevity, writes Andy Kiersz. The utilities industry ranks highest for employee tenure, while the construction field has the highest rate of growth in recent years.

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Business Insider
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Andy Kiersz
4/24/2019

Current and former CEOs share their take on the work-life juggling act, with some admitting that work must come first sometimes, but Brian Dyson, former Coca-Cola CEO, cautions against neglecting health and family. "If you drop one of these, they will be irrevocably scuffed, marked, nicked, damaged or even shattered," he says.