Industry News
Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/15/2021

College athletes who transfer to Division I schools may not have to sit out a year under a rule change under consideration by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The rule, which the board of governors is expected to OK this month, has been used to keep student athletes from being traded but opponents say it limits students' ability to switch schools.

Full Story:
Inside Higher Ed
4/15/2021

A new partnership will allow students at Southeast Technical College to earn an associate's degree and then a bachelor's degree at Dakota Wesleyan University. Degrees include criminal justice, law enforcement, accounting, business administration, media design, digital media, design and marketing.

4/15/2021

Colleges and universities are scrambling to shore up their cybersecurity defenses in the wake of a major attack on 10 schools last month. The attacks expose not only student information, but research data as well.

4/15/2021

West Virginia University and Pierpont Community and Technical College and Sprouting Farms’ Greenville Farm Kitchen will received $1 million federal funding for agricultural workforce training. The schools will split the money evenly.

Full Story:
The Associated Press
More Summaries:
W.Va, West Virginia University
4/14/2021

In about two dozen states, community colleges are permitted to offer four-year degrees, according to the Community College Baccalaureate Association. The practice has become more common in recent years, with advocates saying it helps overcome the challenge of transferring for students who want to earn a four-year degree.

Full Story:
EdSurge
4/14/2021

The NCAA Board of Governors has issued a statement in support of transgender student-athletes and indicated it would pull its collegiate sports events from states with discriminatory laws. Its statement said all student-athletes should "be treated with dignity and respect" and that it will choose championship sites that are "safe, healthy and free of discrimination."

Full Story:
Inside Higher Ed
4/14/2021

Everyone is looking to understand all the implications a year of cancelled in-person learning will have on educators, students, and families. A recent Household Pulse Survey administered by the U.S. Census Bureau reported that by Fall 2020, 1.1% of households with school-age children reported homeschooling. That change represents a doubling of U.S. households that were homeschooling at the start of the 2020-21 school year compared to the prior year. In response to this, district-owned homeschooling creates an opportunity for districts and parents to partner for individualized learning by providing resources and curricula for families.

Full Story:
Tech & Learning
More Summaries:
U.S. Census Bureau
4/14/2021

The realities of pandemic teaching have made the concept of a flipped classroom and flipped learning more appealing than ever before for many educators. "Flipped learning always asked this one simple question: what's the best use of your face-to-face class time," says Jon Bergmann, a high school science teacher and pioneer of flipped learning. In flipped classrooms, material that would be traditionally introduced during in-class lectures is assigned to students outside of class time often in the form of videos or reading. Class time is reserved for students to actively engage in higher-level concepts and problem solving with the teacher available to help them.

Full Story:
Tech & Learning
More Summaries:
Jon Bergmann
4/14/2021

Screencast-O-Matic is a free screen capture system that allows teachers the opportunity to easily share their device screen with students, both in class and during remote learning. Users can share screenshots and record video of actions being carried out - such as showing a student how to use an app they need to work with on a project, for example. Since storage and publishing are online and video editing is built-in, it is a capable yet easy-to-use option for teachers who need to share a screen video quickly and easily.

Full Story:
Tech & Learning
4/14/2021

Charts, graphs, and diagrams are essential tools students and teachers use to visually present data in an informative, attractive, and engaging manner. Multiple sites are available to students to create charts, graphs, and diagrams for assignments in every subject, especially those that rely heavily on data and statistics, such as science, math, history, or social studies. These sites are also great for creating lessons or keeping track of student progress in the classroom, whether in-person or online.

Full Story:
Tech & Learning