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Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/15/2021

The annual celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. at Queens College, part of the City University of New York system, will be virtual this year, with a panel discussion, student participation and a video presentation on activism at the school, President Frank Wu says. Seton Hall University in New Jersey is hosting a for-credit workshop about King, institutional racism and anti-racist behavior, while some college groups around the country are hosting other diversity and inclusion events or days of service.

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Seton Hall University
1/15/2021

Educators in New York began receiving their first doses of coronavirus vaccine earlier this week, and other states are expected to begin vaccinating faculty and staff at schools and colleges in the coming weeks and months. The CDC has classified those who work in education, including teachers, support staff, and daycare staff, as essential workers, but where they fall in line to receive the vaccine still varies by state.

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Tech & Learning
1/15/2021

As districts across the country continue to cope with an ever-evolving global pandemic, educators continue to face a slew of instructional challenges. Thanks to mobile technology, today's teachers have resources that simply didn't exist just ten years ago, and the exponential growth of this technology couldn't be timelier. And while every child's scholastic journey is subjective (especially now), there are plenty of websites dedicated to the augmentation of that journey, if you know where to look.

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Tech & Learning
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remote learning
1/15/2021

The best monitor for teachers in remote learning is something that can make the home-class adaptation much easier. In fact, finding the best monitor can help to give a new perspective on remote learning, literally. When you're trying to view an entire class through small windows in Zoom, this can be straining on the eyes, to say the least.

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Tech & Learning
1/15/2021

Mischief-makers bring the important element of disruption to higher education and shouldn't be discounted during hiring decisions, Shenandoah University dean Michael Stepniak and Lawrence University Conservatory of Music dean Brian Pertl write. They can help round out a team lacking in sometimes helpful risk-takers, resilience and humor, though Stepniak and Pertl offer a few caveats in this commentary.

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Inside Higher Ed
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Shenandoah University
1/15/2021

At least 4,000 Columbia University students in New York City have pledged to participate in a tuition-payment strike on Jan. 22, saying that administrators' efforts to drop late fees, increase financial aid and provide grants don't go far enough to ease students' financial burden, says sophomore Matthew Gamero, one of the organizers. The students are also calling for action on campus anti-racism plans, better labor rights for student workers, affordable housing in the surrounding West Harlem community and divestment from fossil fuels.

1/15/2021

Enrollment of Black, first-time students has increased at historically Black colleges and universities by 20% in recent years in states with an increase in hate crime reports, according to research from Stanford University's Center for Education Policy Analysis. Researchers say the data has limitations -- unreported incidents and inconsistent classification of hate crimes -- but that their conclusions are consistent with similar research.

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Higher Ed Dive
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Stanford University
1/15/2021

The Education Department opened up $21.2 billion from the latest pandemic relief package to colleges and universities, and more is due soon specifically for historically Black schools, other minority-serving institutions and those that have been hit especially hard. Because the money is considered supplemental, colleges won't have to apply for it, but getting the funds still involves paperwork and following certain guidelines and restrictions, Justin Draeger, president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, says.

1/15/2021

President-elect Joe Biden is pitching a $175 billion plan to get children back into K-12 classrooms and bolster the finances of colleges and universities nearly a year after the coronavirus pandemic throttled public education systems in the U.S. The plan, part of a larger economic stimulus Biden announced Thursday, includes $130 billion for public elementary, middle and high schools and approximately $35 billion for institutions of higher education.

1/14/2021

President-elect Joe Biden has proffered his plans for addressing the $1.6 trillion student loan crisis, including extending the current forbearance period and directing Congress to forgive $10,000 per borrower. Questions remain, though, on the timeframe for this rollout and whether or not he can assert executive powers to cancel debt and what the plan could look like over the long term.