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Higher Ed
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9/30/2020

Low-income students have a better chance of becoming higher-income adults when they attend colleges that put more emphasis than other schools on liberal arts, a report from Ithaka S+R suggests. However, a stronger, more interactive liberal arts education does not provide a similar boost for mid-career earnings or rates of student debt repayment, the report shows.

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Education Dive
9/30/2020

Every aspect of finishing a dissertation and applying for jobs is stressful, says education and training specialist Daniel Moglen, who offers several ways to inject some positivity into the process. Appreciating the small wins and finding others to share your experiences with can help, he writes in this commentary.

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Inside Higher Ed
9/30/2020

Addressing child care needs when children are learning remotely is impeding some women's efforts toward publication and promotion in higher education, some women in academia say. In addition, some universities' decisions to give faculty members more time to meet tenure requirements have unexpectedly hurt women, some of whom say they would prefer child care subsidies, fewer teaching obligations or an adjusted selection criteria during the pandemic.

9/30/2020

More than 50 humanities and social sciences doctoral programs are coping with the effects of the coronavirus pandemic by not accepting new students for fall 2021 and devoting what funding and resources they have to current students. Long-term implications of the pause could include an opportunity for schools to reevaluate their programs, but also could harm diversity of the student pipeline, according to Suzanne Ortega, president of the Council of Graduate Schools.

9/29/2020

Many colleges and universities lack adequate supports and policies for the estimated 20% of their students who are parents and who face the additional pandemic-related challenges, including financial strain, remote learning for themselves and their school-age children along with other concerns. "It feels like I have to make a choice between finishing my program and being a parent," doctoral student Erin Palmer said.

9/29/2020

The nearly 20% of US college students who have a disability often grapple with technology -- especially during online learning caused by the pandemic -- making it incumbent upon faculty to design and teach classes with such students in mind. While many students will require customized tools and personalized support, Penny Rosenblum, director of research for the American Foundation for the Blind, offers some general recommendations for creating better audio and visual accessibility.

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EdTech online
9/29/2020

University-based retirement communities likely will experience strong growth in three to five years as baby boomers continue to reach retirement age, and while the universities of Florida, Alabama, Michigan and others don't own or run the facilities, they usually have a financial tie that can provide a small slice of budget help. The portion of retirement residents who are alumni, retired faculty and relatives bolster college communities as students of noncredit classes, fans of university sports and mentors.

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unbound.upcea.edu
9/29/2020

College students worldwide are pushing back against increasing requirements to install proctoring software as institutions work to ensure fair assessments and reduce the risk of cheating during remote learning. At the City University of New York, students gathered 27,000 signatures for a petition that led to the removal of requirement that students use such software.

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ZDNet
9/29/2020

Newspaper reports identified Richard Blum -- a $15 million donor to the University of California at Berkeley and husband of U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. -- as the author of a letter of recommendation for a waitlisted student that reportedly violated a University of California Board of Regents admissions policy and that was part of a state audit of admissions at some campuses of the university system. Blum apologized for being unaware of the policy, while others are called for fewer back doors to college admissions, especially at taxpayer-funded institutions.

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Inside Higher Ed
9/29/2020

A Duke University building first opened before the school opened its doors to Black people is being renamed for Wilhelmina Reuben-Cooke, one of the first five Black students to enroll in 1963. Part of a larger effort to "honor key contributors to the university who have been overlooked," the move marks the first time a Duke building has been named after a Black woman, the university said.

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CNN