Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/24/2019

Hispanic males, no matter their educational level, had higher employment rates than their black peers, but were underrepresented in well-paying careers that required a four-year degree or more, according to research from Clemson University. Lamont Flowers, executive director of the Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education, says the research can be used by schools to help foster better outcomes for underrepresented students.

More Summaries:
Clemson University
4/24/2019

Hiring managers appreciate the time taken to make cover letters connect with them and the company, writes Stephanie Vozza. Job seekers should address letters to a hiring manager by name and quickly draw the reader into the copy by describing how their experience relates to the company's mission, Vozza suggests.

Full Story:
Fast Company online
More Summaries:
Stephanie Vozza
4/24/2019

As the number of undergraduates declines, some colleges and universities are adding more graduate programs where enrollment numbers are climbing. The strategy can help schools improve their bottom line, but some experts say the extra degree can result in more debt for students without the guarantee of a better job.

Full Story:
The Hechinger Report
4/24/2019

A study shows an increase in the availability of federal Grad PLUS loans in 2006 did not drive up the cost of tuition at business and medical schools. Researchers note, however, that more selective business schools were more likely to raise their tuition over the years than less-selective schools.

Full Story:
Inside Higher Ed
4/24/2019

Women made up 47% of the lowest-paid dean positions in 2018-19, with only 20% of the five highest-paid dean positions being occupied by women, according to a report from the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources. The data also show the highest annual raises went to administrators, including chief financial officers and provosts.

4/24/2019

A $10 million donation from Case Western Reserve University law school alumnus Coleman Burke will enable the school to expand its curriculum and open a new environmental law center. The new center at the Ohio university will be named for Burke, a real estate company founder who has been active in advocating for environmental causes.

4/23/2019

To prepare the workforce for the future, colleges and universities will need to adjust their curricula and delivery methods to equip workers with soft skills and technical knowledge, according to a white paper from the World Economic Forum and the Boston Consulting Group. Providing lifelong learning opportunities and access to education is key to developing workers for the future, the authors note.

Full Story:
Education Dive
More Summaries:
Boston Consulting Group
4/23/2019

Data from US Immigration and Customs Enforcement show a 2.7% decline in the number of international students studying in K-12 and higher-education settings in the US this March, compared with March 2018. The largest decline came from students from Saudi Arabia and South Korea, the data show.

Full Story:
Inside Higher Ed
4/23/2019

Diana Natalicio, who will retire this year as president of the University of Texas at El Paso after 31 years at the helm, says she stayed on to achieve her goals of opening up admissions, adding doctoral programs and assembling a top-notch faculty. "I knew that in five years or 10 years, I wasn't going to get done what needed to be done to achieve our goals of both access and excellence," she says.

4/23/2019

The University of Missouri is cutting the budgets of many administrative offices by $25 million to provide more money for faculty raises, research and student scholarships. The changes to the fiscal year 2020 budget will not lead to layoffs, officials say, but costs will be covered, in part, by not filling some vacant positions.

More Summaries:
University of Missouri