K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/24/2019

Students studying to be teachers at Ohio University are gaining classroom experience through the Patton College of Education's 12 collaborative partnerships with six school districts. The program allows some districts to offer programs, including literacy programs, they otherwise could not afford.

More Summaries:
Ohio university
4/24/2019

The 18-year-old Florida woman who recently sent Denver metro schools into a panic because of a perceived threat may be similar to some students who many teachers try to reach, writes Kathy Evenson, a National Board Certified Teacher of language arts in Commerce City, Colo. In this blog post, Evenson urges teachers, administrators and law enforcement officials to work with students who may be dealing with mental health challenges.

Full Story:
Chalkbeat
4/24/2019

Students from low-income families who use vouchers from the Louisiana Scholarship Program to enroll in private schools tend to perform worse on state standardized math tests, according to a study. Despite the lower scores, researchers say those students are just as likely to get into college as their peers who did not use vouchers.

Full Story:
WWNO-FM (New Orleans)
4/24/2019

Even though 19 states now mandate financial-literacy classes for students, Timothy Ogden, managing director of the Financial Access Initiative at New York University, says there's no research showing such classes will improve later financial decisions. Instead, studies show taking more math classes and being offered financial information right before making such decisions have a more positive effect on financial health, he notes.

4/24/2019

Some teachers and administrators in Arizona say the state's failure to adequately fund special education -- or even to study the costs -- has devastating effects on students. They cite a lack of classroom supplies and difficulty recruiting paraprofessionals and are calling on the state to change its school-funding formula.

4/23/2019

The Panasonic Foundation and the Hispanic Heritage Foundation are launching four academies -- in Atlanta; Calexico, Calif.; Newark, N.J.; and Reno, Nev. -- aimed at teaching coding as a second language to middle- and high-school students. One goal of the program is to expose students of color from low-income backgrounds to STEM-related courses.

Full Story:
T.H.E. Journal
4/23/2019

Funding has stalled the widespread adoption of augmented- and virtual-reality technologies in classrooms, according to a report from ABI Research. Forecasts show that the education sector is projected to spend $6 billion annually on such technologies and that some equipment costs are expected to fall.

Full Story:
T.H.E. Journal
More Summaries:
ABI Research, $6 billion
4/23/2019

The process of building the classroom "word wall" engages students in learning, writes Justine Bruyere, a lecturer at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. In this blog post, Bruyere shares five strategies for improving the literacy tool, including working together to establish rules and celebrating the words.

Full Story:
Edutopia online
4/23/2019

A Washington, D.C., school has installed a recording studio as part of an urban arts program intended to help keep students engaged in school. One sophomore has used the studio as an outlet to share his songs, written about his friends and classmates killed in gun violence.

More Summaries:
Washington
4/23/2019

Lessons and conversations about food are a good way to introduce students to global concepts, across subject areas, Sarah Anderson writes. Anderson shares several food-related activities that a colleague uses in her classroom, including a geography lesson in which students map their food sources.

More Summaries:
Sarah Anderson