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8/16/2019

A new bill sponsored by Rep. Donna Shalala, D-Fla., and Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., would require that student loan borrowers receive monthly updates about their loans including information about projected payments and other fees. Lynn Pasquerella, president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, said approval of the measure would be "an important step forward in addressing the student debt crisis."

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Inside Higher Ed
8/16/2019

Understanding how groups of people have been categorized by labels, such as Native American versus American Indian, can help students develop the skills needed to tackle controversial topics, writes history teacher Lauren Brown. In this blog post, Brown suggests ways to construct lessons around this topic, including the study of why some names are offensive.

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MiddleWeb
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Lauren Brown
8/16/2019

Students who feel more connected with their families, peers and schools are less likely to participate in bullying, according to a survey of 900 middle-schoolers by researchers at the University of Missouri's College of Education. Researchers also found that students can move in and out of bullying behavior.

8/16/2019

Teachers are more likely to ask other teachers for advice on instruction but turn to administrators and support staff for nonacademic needs, such as challenges with behavior or attendance, according to Rand Corp.'s American Educator Panels. Some teachers report they are building their own resources from information found online and in print materials.

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Education Dive
8/16/2019

A report aims to help community-based organizations incorporate digital tools into their youth programs to help nurture social and emotional learning skills. Tools, including esports programs and digital maker projects, are good ways to teach collaboration, relationship-building and empathy, says Rafi Santo, a researcher for the report.

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Edutopia
8/16/2019

Courtroom technology aids, starting with the venerable PowerPoint, increasingly have become necessary to hold the attention of juries, writes attorney Matt Lalande. He analyzes trial presentation software with an important caveat about unfamiliar courtrooms: Check out the tech capabilities before the trial.

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Law Technology Today
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Matt Lalande
8/16/2019

Newly minted lawyers interviewing for jobs should expect to be asked about legaltech, writes Dan Reed, CEO of UnitedLex. "Digital lawyers set themselves apart by combining legal knowledge with the technological savvy to predict what may happen to that dusty deliverable down the line," he writes.

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Legaltech, Dan Reed
8/16/2019

Christina Mier, an elementary-school teacher in El Paso, Texas, says she has revised her instructional planning in the wake of racially-motivated violence in her community. In this opinion article, Mier shares how she plans to create a safe space for students in which they accept one another, share similarities and celebrate their differences.

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El Paso, Christina Mier, Texas
8/16/2019

Students who complete the third year of a high-school construction program in Georgia receive hands-on instruction and earn three workforce certifications -- including a certificate in carpentry, electrical, plumbing or masonry. Next year, the school is launching a dual-enrollment program with an area community college.

8/16/2019

Eighth-grade science teacher Terri Skinner spent part of the summer exploring how climate change is affecting the Arctic. Skinner set sail from Norway with professors and researchers, maintained a blog about her experiences to share with students and plans to start a climate club at her school in Texas.

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Terri Skinner, Arctic, Norway