Renewable Energy
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/23/2019

The US political climate isn't right for a carbon tax or any other type of carbon legislation, which means action won't likely be taken until 2021 or 2022 after the next presidential election, said Enel Green Power's Kyle Davis and other panelists at WINDPOWER 2019. Preliminary measures could make an appearance in Congress later this year or in 2020.

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WINDPOWER, Enel Green Power, Congress
5/23/2019

WINDPOWER 2019 is underway in Houston, and this year's theme, WIND+, is perfect because it shows how the wind industry is working together with a wide range of sectors to build a stronger US energy mix, says American Wind Energy Association President and CEO Tom Kiernan. "We're here in Houston, Energy Capital of the World, to showcase what makes wind power America's most competitive source of new electricity generation and to set the table for business deals that will keep US energy workers busy for years to come," Kiernan says.

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Daily Energy Insider
5/23/2019

Texas may be the nation's energy leader, but tension is mounting between the state's fossil fuel and renewables industries, as the latter spreads misinformation about support mechanisms for wind and solar, renewables lobbyist Jean Ryall said at WINDPOWER. Contrary to rumors, the wind industry does pay property taxes.

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WINDPOWER
5/23/2019

China, the US and France have the best markets for renewables right now based on opportunities for investment and deployment, according to EY's biannual Renewable Energy Attractiveness Index. The industry, it notes, is entering "a new phase of subsidy-free growth across the world," which will likely result in more projects competing on their own merits without government backing.

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CleanTechnica
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EY
5/23/2019

Texas could see its potential for wind generation rise 1% to 4% by 2050, while there could be a surge in wind activity on the East Coast and a decline in the Midwest, according to National Renewable Energy Laboratory calculations using a worse-case scenario for climate change. "The spatial and temporal differences in our results highlight the importance of using high-resolution data sets to study the potential impacts of climate change on wind and solar power," says co-author Michael Craig.

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Physics World
5/23/2019

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy has won a contract to supply EDF Renewables with 66 turbines for the 232-megawatt Milligan wind farm in Nebraska. The site will feature 36 2.7-MW 129 and 30 4.5-MW 145 machines.

5/23/2019

The Public Service Co. of New Mexico filed a motion with the state Public Regulation Commission on Tuesday asking it to reconsider a transmission line that the utility argues would benefit all of its customers. The project is a "network upgrade" and would benefit everyone, it says, rather than just carrying wind energy to Facebook's site as previously implied by a utility executive.

5/23/2019

Sulzer Schmid and WKA will use drones to inspect the blades of 1,250 Vestas turbines in Sweden and Finland over a 12-week period. A drone-based approach will ensure the task is completed in enough time for Vestas to finish repairs during the upcoming season, the company says.

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Vestas, Vestas
5/23/2019

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management has been trying to "balance key existing uses" such as scalloping in the New York Bight with offshore wind development to avoid potential issues, says spokesman Stephen Boutwell. "It's better that they take their time and get the details right," says Business Network for Offshore Wind Executive Vice President Ross Tyler.

5/23/2019

Maryland's Clean and Renewable Energy Standard calling for 50% renewables by 2030 is expected to become law Friday, even though Gov. Larry Hogan canceled a meeting for today to sign off on the legislation. "This better and bolder goal is what our state should be striving for as we continue to set an example for the rest of the nation," says Hogan, who has expressed support for the measure.

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The Baltimore Sun
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Gov. Larry Hogan