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12/13/2018

A Black Book survey of health care executives found that an EHR implementation or replacement caused concerns about the future of their employment in 64% of respondents, while 5% reported that they or their colleagues were asked to resign or were fired because of the effect of EHR rollouts on costs or productivity. Ninety-three percent of respondents had little regret over their choice of EHR vendor, but 88% of those from smaller regional health systems expressed dissatisfaction, listing issues such as physician and clinical burnout, hidden costs, reliability issues, consumer frustration and time-extended rollouts.

12/13/2018

One in 11 US adults age 50 and older lacks a partner, spouse or living child, 1 in 6 baby boomers lives alone, and 8.3% report frequent loneliness. One study estimated that social isolation among older adults costs Medicare $6.7 billion each year, and former CMS Administrator Donald Berwick says loneliness must be addressed "if we want to achieve health for our population, especially vulnerable people."

12/13/2018

"Sesame Street" is reaching out to children facing homelessness by bringing back a character named Lily, introduced in 2011 and now staying with friends due to loss of her home. "We want them to know that they are not alone and home is more than a house or an apartment -- home is wherever the love lives," said Sherrie Westin, president of global impact and philanthropy at Sesame Workshop.

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Sesame Workshop, Lily
12/13/2018

Hospice and palliative care are becoming more widely accepted for veterinary end-of-life care instead of intensive measures or euthanasia. Ana Homayoun chose palliative care for her elderly dog with congestive heart failure and believes the choice was the right one for both her dog and herself.

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Ana Homayoun
12/13/2018

The Assiniboine and Sioux tribes at Fort Peck Reservation are leading a project to restore native bison, which numbered up to 30 million a couple of hundred years ago before being driven nearly to extinction. The tribes had to overcome political resistance to acquire bison from the herd at Yellowstone National Park, which are genetically pure but some of which also carry brucellosis, and as the Fort Peck herd has grown, the ecosystem has rebounded.

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The Guardian (London)
12/13/2018

Israeli researchers improved DiaRem, a standard scoring system used to predict remission time for type 2 diabetes, extending the prediction time from one to five years after patients underwent weight-loss surgery, including gastric banding, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. The findings, published in the Obesity Surgery journal, revealed that the "ability to predict an individual's reaction to weight-loss surgery gives both doctors and patients the clarity they need to make informed medical decisions," said study author Dr. Rachel Golan.

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Diabetes (UK)
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diabetes
12/13/2018

A study in Diabetes Care showed that the rate of nontraumatic lower extremity amputations among US diabetes patients declined from 5.4 cases for every 1,000 adults in 2000 to 3.1 cases in 2009, but rose to 4.6 cases between 2009 and 2015. Amputations among younger adults ages 18 to 44 dropped from 2.9 cases per 1,000 adults in 2000 to 2.1 cases in 2009, then increased to 4.2 cases by 2015, while among middle-aged adults ages 45 to 64, amputations decreased from 6.9 cases per 1,000 adults in 2000 to 3.8 cases in 2009, then increased to 5.4 cases by 2015.

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Reuters
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Diabetes Care
12/13/2018

Eating a heavy red-meat diet for one month raised plasma and urine levels of trimethylamine N-oxide, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, by more than two-fold, compared with a diet high in white meat or a non-meat protein, according to a study in the European Heart Journal. Eating a white meat or non-meat protein diet for four weeks, however, returned blood and urine TMAO levels to baseline.

12/13/2018

Northwell Health hopes implementing biometric facial recognition technology, which it has tested at two of its physician practices, will enhance the patient experience by reducing the need for data entry or exchange. Keely Aarnes, an associate vice president with Northwell, said the use of biometrics helped the system reduce duplicate records and could prevent fraud.

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HealthLeaders Media
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Northwell, Northwell Health
12/13/2018

A survey of state lawmakers about their health policy priorities found four areas for bipartisanship, researchers wrote in The New England Journal of Medicine. The main themes included access to care, health costs, dissatisfaction with a dysfunctional Washington environment and a willingness to work around philosophical differences about government's role in health care.