Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/18/2019

An analysis by ProPublica and Bayerischer Rundfunk identified 187 servers in the US that stored medical data and were not protected by password or other standard security measures, leaving medical images and health data exposed to anyone with basic computer expertise. Though the analysis did not find evidence that exposed records had been misused, US law requires that patient data be securely stored.

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ProPublica
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ProPublica
9/18/2019

American Medical Association President Patrice Harris and former President David Barbe, who spoke at AHIMA's annual meeting, said administrative barriers to medication-assisted addiction treatment and rehabilitation should be removed, and civil and criminal justice reforms that improve access to high-quality, evidence-based care should be supported. Health care organizations and providers must "maintain high-quality clinical documentation to guarantee the data on this topic is accurate to continue to properly guide research and education regarding opioid addiction," said AHIMA CEO Wylecia Wiggs Harris.

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Health Exec
9/18/2019

Drugviu won $5,000 in the first AHIMA pitch competition for its population health platform designed to improve clinical trial participation opportunities for people of color, provide tailored health education resources and provide an online platform for community engagement. Runners-up included Valhalla Healthcare, Uppstroms, Smarter Health and Tapcloud.

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AHIMA
9/18/2019

A coalition that includes the American Medical Association, the Federation of American Hospitals and the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives asked the ONC to phase in compliance with proposed data blocking and interoperability rules, clarify some of the language, update certification processes and strengthen data privacy provisions. The Health Information Technology Advisory Committee said the coalition's recommendations would be taken into consideration in its annual report.

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Healthcare Dive
9/18/2019

Artificial intelligence and machine learning platforms that do not include demographically representative data could produce biased results and reinforce existing clinical biases, biomedical ethics and medicine professor David Magnus said in the keynote address at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's annual meeting. In a moderated discussion after the address, machine learning and health care professor Suchi Saria said algorithms must be designed more holistically to account for biases.

9/17/2019

A range of information technologies, including blockchain, biometrics, internet of things, microsegmentation and virtual gateways, can help the health care and pharmaceutical industries deliver safe, secure patient care, particularly when used in combination, writes Unisys Senior Vice President of Technology Vishal Gupta.

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Forbes
9/17/2019

A new remote patient monitoring system at Gila Regional Medical Center in New Mexico will enable people who have suffered a stroke to receive care locally from neurologists at the University of New Mexico Hospital in Albuquerque, says emergency medical director Dr. Stephen Kotch. The camera and video link connects patients and emergency physicians and nurses with a neurologist to guide treatment, including administration of thrombolytics.

9/17/2019

The digital version of the Brief International Cognitive Assessment for Multiple Sclerosis is as reliable as the paper-based version, researchers reported in the International Journal of MS Care. The digital assessment, called iCAMS, "is a promising tool that will facilitate the use of an established and recommended cognitive battery for multiple sclerosis in clinical settings," researchers wrote.

9/17/2019

Apple is delving deeper into medical research with its wearable monitors and research kit, and the studies might bring forth new features while advancing science, writes Victoria Song. Apple has partnered with highly respected research institutions and appears to be serious about both clinical methodology and privacy, Song writes.

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Gizmodo
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Apple, Victoria Song
9/17/2019

Privacy impact assessments are more than a diagnostic tool or regulatory compliance checklist, as they can provide insight into an organization's risk exposure and allow vulnerabilities to be addressed during product development, says Privacy Professor CEO Rebecca Herold. PIAs can prevent or mitigate the effects of privacy breaches, potentially differentiating companies in highly competitive markets, Herold says.

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Rebecca Herold