Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/17/2019

A new survey by security company Gemalto has found that almost half of companies using internet of things devices have no way to determine if their devices are being hacked, despite citing security as one of the most important ways to earn customer trust. By 2023, an estimated 20 billion devices are expected to be on the market, but marketers are looking to government entities to set standards and regulations regarding cybersecurity, respondents told Gemalto.

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Fast Company online
1/17/2019

The Amazon Comprehend Medical machine learning software introduced in November could address the health care industry's lack of a means to make use of its massive stores of patient data, says industry consultant Michael Abrams. The news also highlights the continuing push of nontraditional players into the health IT market and how they could accelerate the pace of change set by the current major health IT providers.

1/17/2019

The health care industry no longer has an excuse to delay implementation of a blockchain solution with the addition of various platforms, said David Chou, CIO and digital officer of Children's Mercy Kansas City hospital in Missouri. As for which platform to pick, Chou advises health IT leaders to look for the one that garners a large number of tested use cases and thus gains community trust.

1/17/2019

Physicians do not have enough advanced alternative payment models or enough opportunities to participate in them, MGMA says. The Physician-Focused Payment Model Technical Advisory Committee says models should be designed to reduce avoidable events and mortality, decrease expenditures and increase choice and access; however, the Department of Health and Human Services has been slow to approve new models.

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FierceHealthcare
1/17/2019

Patient portal adoption rates hit more than 90% last year, MGMA data show, but there are still ongoing challenges to patient data access, according to the 2018 ONC Annual Report to Congress. "Patients should be able to easily and securely access their medical data through their smartphones. Currently, patients electronically access their health information through patient portals that prevent them from easily pulling from multiple sources or health care providers," the report says.

1/17/2019

About one-third of healthcare organizations use one of three proprietary data-sharing approaches to health information exchange: data exchange between physicians who "use the same EHR," those who "use an EHR that participates in an EHR vendor alliance" and physicians who "are part of the same integrated system." Smaller facilities using less-popular IT systems are at a disadvantage, according to a study in the American Journal of Managed Care.

1/16/2019

A drug that combines two antibodies protected ferrets and monkeys against the Bundibugyo, Sudan and Zaire strains of Ebola virus in a single dose, researchers reported in Cell Host & Microbe. The results suggest the drug would continue to offer protection as the virus evolves, says Thomas Geisbert, a professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

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HealthDay News
1/16/2019

A study published in Advanced Functional Materials demonstrated the potential for organs-on-a-chip to replace animals in some toxicity studies. Scientists developed a system comprising heart, liver, skeletal muscle and nervous system modules that maintained cellular viability and function for 28 days, and they were able to do real-time monitoring of the cells' electrical and mechanical functions.

1/16/2019

An experimental agent has shown promise as a lifesaving treatment after exposure to the deadly ricin toxin, according to research from the Tulane National Primate Research Center. The study, conducted in non-human primates, could pave the way for post-exposure and prophylactic treatment of emergency workers to protect against the potential bioterrorism agent.

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Tulane University
1/16/2019

Research scientist Anna Casey is studying mouse lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center to learn more about neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease in people. Mouse lemurs' relatively short life spans and genetic similarity to humans make them excellent study subjects, says Casey, who teaches willing lemurs cognitive tasks.