Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/23/2019

Officials at Equitas Health, which provides health care services to LGBTQ communities in 11 cities in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, have issued notification letters to 569 patients whose protected health information may have been compromised in January in an email phishing attack against the business. The HHS Office for Civil Rights and other authorities have been notified, and Equitas has offered a free year of identity monitoring to affected patients.

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Equitas, HHS
5/23/2019

The AHIMA Triumph Awards honor the excellence, dedication and service of those professionals whose steadfast efforts have demonstrated extraordinary leadership, volunteerism and talent in the HIM field. Submit your nominees by June 3. The AHIMA Triumph Awards are sponsored by 3M.

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ahima.org
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AHIMA
5/23/2019

Burnout is largely caused by problems in the working environment but is often incorrectly viewed as a problem with the individual physician, says Christina Maslach, professor of psychology at the University of California at Berkeley. A healthy workplace can be created by evaluating workloads, providing positive feedback and building a supportive community.

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University of California
5/23/2019

The number of consumers who want to engage with healthcare providers via digital methods is increasing, and practices can use this to improve patient engagement, write Matt Henry and Susan Kanvik, healthcare consultants with Point B. Practices must understand what their patients' specific needs are before selecting the appropriate digital technology, they write.

5/23/2019

Nutrition, stress management and weight loss programs offered outside the physician's office would make a patient more loyal, according to a survey by Welltok. Almost 75% of those surveyed want to communicate with their provider between appointments and most patients want personalized care.

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Healthcare Finance
5/23/2019

The majority of final-year medical residents say they would prefer to work for a hospital or group practice instead of opening an independent practice, according to a survey by Merritt Hawkins, a physician search firm. Final-year residents are also receiving many job offers and higher pay due to a shortage of physicians.

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Fortune
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Merritt Hawkins
5/23/2019

The Health IT Advisory Committee recommended creating a different task force to create requirements for price transparency, warning that efforts to finalize the current ONC rule on interoperability could be hampered if transparency continues to be linked to the proposed information-blocking rules. HITAC also recommended allowing health IT developers charge fees for basic access to patient data, but only to recoup expenses.

5/23/2019

A jury in New York ruled Tuesday that Johnson & Johnson must pay a minimum of $25 million to a woman who sued the company after she said she contracted mesothelioma as a result of using J&J's talc products for decades. In a separate case, a South Carolina jury ruled in favor of J&J on Tuesday, finding that the company was not responsible for a woman's mesothelioma case that she argued was caused by asbestos in its baby powder.

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Johnson & Johnson
5/22/2019

Defensive molecules from lampreys were used to deliver the cancer drug doxorubicin into the brains of mice with glioblastoma, significantly extending life span compared with a control group, researchers reported in Science Advances. The molecules circulated through the body but did not accumulate in other organs or in healthy brain tissue, and the researchers believe they could also be used to treat brain trauma or stroke.

5/22/2019

A ransomware attack against the government of Baltimore on May 7, the second cyberattack on the city in 15 months, locked out its Health Department, rendering health officials and other departments unable to access a state network for drug overdose notification and other digital content on government systems. Hackers have demanded a ransom of 13 bitcoins to unlock the data, but Baltimore Mayor Jack Young said the city will not pay.

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Cyberattack