Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/17/2019

Scientists used an engineered version of antibodies from alpacas and chimeric antigen receptor T cells to penetrate protective barriers on solid tumors. The researchers reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the new cells slowed tumor growth and extended survival in mouse models of colon cancer and melanoma.

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FierceBiotech
4/17/2019

Researchers analyzed the activities of 80 internal medicine interns from March 10 to May 31, 2016, and found that the interns spent more than 43% of their average time in a 24-hour period using EHRs and little time on direct patient care or educational activities. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that while interns were conducting indirect patient care activities over a 24-hour period, 28% of all educational activities and 23% of all direct patient care happened at the same time.

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EHR Intelligence
4/17/2019

The Clinical Problem Database was introduced by the American Medical Association and Sling Health, a biotechnology incubator run by students at Washington University in St. Louis, to help gather physician feedback related to patient care and clinical efficiency that could be used to develop new medical technology products. "Gaining insights from physicians will help make medical technology an asset, not a burden," said Michael Tutty, group vice president of professional satisfaction and practice sustainability for the AMA.

4/17/2019

The Notice of Public Rule Making 60-day comment window ends May 3, 2019. Here's a quick overview of each rule, highlighting key points.

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journal.ahima.org
4/17/2019

AHIMA's Revenue Cycle Trainer Workshop is a dynamic, eight-week experience that prepares seasoned revenue cycle professionals to train others in industry best practices through best-in-class AHIMA curriculum. Virtually delivered -- there's no travel required. Reserve your spot for our next program, which starts Sept. 25. Don't wait -- our winter offering sold out!

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my.ahima.org
More Summaries:
AHIMA
4/17/2019

Low-intensity ultrasound waves directed at certain areas of the brain change decision-making processes and behavior and have the potential to improve the lives of people with mental health conditions or cognitive impairment, according to a study in monkeys that was published in Nature Neuroscience. The researchers determined that counterfactual thinking occurs in the anterior cingulate cortex of the brain, and monkeys' decision-making changed after low-intensity ultrasound was used to disrupt activity in that area.

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New Atlas
4/17/2019

Scientists are generally hesitant to discuss their work openly, and this tendency has allowed misguided activists to control the narrative about biomedical research involving animals, writes Cindy Buckmaster, director of the Center for Comparative Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. Science and facts are powerful persuaders, and the public needs to hear the stories researchers have to tell while remaining mindful of safety and security, Buckmaster writes.

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The Scientist online
4/17/2019

Yale University scientists have restored or preserved some cellular function in brains from pigs that had been dead several hours. An article published in Nature described the experiment, which involved pumping a chemical cocktail into the brains for six hours after the pigs had been dead for four hours, then comparing them to untreated brains.

4/16/2019

CynergisTek's 2019 annual report said 23% of third-party vendors working with health care organizations were responsible for a medium- to high-risk data breach, and the vendors involved reportedly lacked risk assessment, governance, identity management and access controls, information protection and procedures, and asset-management capabilities. Researchers also found that 72% of health care providers comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, and 47% of providers and their business associates conform with controls under the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Cybersecurity Framework.

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Health IT Security
4/16/2019

Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., has introduced the Privacy Bill of Rights Act, which would require companies to only collect pertinent data and get opt-in consent from consumers before collecting their information. Markey said the bill "puts discriminatory data uses out of bounds and tells companies that they can only collect the information that is necessary to provide the product or service requested by the consumer."

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Health IT Security