News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/21/2019

HIMSS polled 269 health IT leaders in the US and found that security, cybersecurity and privacy are the top concerns among hospital IT leaders, followed by improving quality outcomes; clinician engagement and clinical informatics; process improvement, workflow and change management; and care coordination and culture of care. Researchers also found that the expanding role of information security leaders on hospital IT leadership teams could create internal tensions.

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HealthLeaders Media
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HIMSS
2/21/2019

Meetings can be improved by auditing the existing process, Lila MacLellan writes -- maybe a few people speak too much, the meeting is too crowded or differing opinions aren't welcomed. "A leader's experience of the meeting appears to be fundamentally different from the experiences of other meeting attendees, with leaders thinking things were, well, quite glorious," says Steven Rogelberg, author of a book about meetings.

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Quartz
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Lila MacLellan, Steven Rogelberg
2/21/2019

University of Calgary social work student Kloie Picot says her decision to pursue social work and help marginalized people was inspired by the years she spent in Southeast Asia photographing sex workers and transgender performers. An exhibition of Picot's work is included in an Alberta, Canada, photography festival.

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University of Calgary
2/21/2019

Dutch researchers recruited 1,616 patients with type 2 diabetes and found that a hybrid deep learning-enhanced device had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 97.8% for detecting vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy and a 79.4% sensitivity and a 93.8% specificity for more than mild DR, compared with the reference standard. Researchers said t findings, published in Diabetes Care, could help improve the accuracy of DR detection.

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Diabetes Care
2/21/2019

A study in Diabetes Care showed a comparable percentage of type 1 diabetes patients with similar A1C levels measured using a glucose management indicator and laboratory A1C tests. Researchers conducted randomized controlled trials of the Dexcom, Guardian 3 and Navigator 2 glucose sensors and found a significant number of patients with clinically meaningful differences in glucose sensor-derived A1C using GMI and laboratory-derived A1C levels.

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Endocrinology Advisor
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GMI, Diabetes Care, Dexcom
2/21/2019

Diabetes was still tied to an 18% increase in cardiovascular disease-related death and a 16% increase in dying from any cause from 2002 to 2014, despite medical advances and lower diabetes-related deaths since the 1980s and 1990s, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers analyzed data on more than 960,000 individuals and also found the lowest levels of death among those with diabetes whose A1C levels were between 6% and 6.9%.

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HealthDay News
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diabetes
2/21/2019

Researchers found sex differences across major cardiovascular risk factors, with women having an average body mass index of 29.6 compared with 29 for men, and 42% of women having high blood pressure compared with 49% of men. The findings, published in the journal Circulation, showed that 13% of men and 11% of women had diabetes, but only 20% and 30% had their disease under control, respectively.

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diabetes
2/21/2019

Decreasing reimbursements and improving the patient experience are top challenges for 2019, according to a survey of 100 health system leaders by Porter Research. Other priorities include upgrading IT and cybersecurity.

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FierceHealthcare
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Porter Research
2/21/2019

Kaiser Permanente and New York University's Long Island School of Medicine plan to tackle specific health care needs using a strategy of opening medical schools with free tuition. Kaiser will focus on integrating population health management strategies into physician education, and NYU Long Island wants to increase the number of primary care providers.

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Health IT Analytics
2/21/2019

Cambridge, Mass.-based Foundation Medicine, which uses genomic profiling to link cancer patients with treatments and clinical trials, topped Fast Company's list of the 10 most innovative biotech companies. San Francisco-based Arterys came in second for developing an artificial intelligence-based platform for medical imaging.