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2/22/2019

Google has teamed up with CVS Health, the Drug Enforcement Administration, HHS, Walgreens Boots Alliance and state governments to display local prescription drug disposal sites on Google Maps after seeing searches for local medication disposal spike amid the opioid crisis. The project, which will start in seven states before expanding nationwide, will enable users to map nearby permanent drug disposal spots at hospitals, pharmacies or government buildings.

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Fox Business, USA Today
2/22/2019

Benefit brokers can help companies that have financial wellness programs that do not successfully engage employees, according to panelists at the Workplace Benefits Renaissance convention. "Simplicity is key; the more complex the program, the less likely employees are to engage," said MetLife's Jeffrey Tulloch.

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MetLife
2/22/2019

Metro Nashville Public Schools opened a wellness center this year, with a health clinic and pharmacy as well as free gym access, fitness classes and personal trainers. The district also has turned portable classrooms into medical clinics at five schools to give employees easy access to care.

2/22/2019

Registered dietitians at New Hanover Regional Medical Center in Wilmington, N.C., evaluate patients for malnutrition and those who meet the criteria get a discharge nutrition food box and instructions on proper nourishment for recovery. "We cannot expect our patients to bounce back from a trauma, stroke, fall, surgery or any other medical condition if their nutrition is inadequate," said RD Angela Lago.

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malnutrition
2/22/2019

Postpartum depression, particularly in the Muslim community, often goes untreated because women feel guilty regarding not meeting expectations of joyful motherhood, clinical social worker Najwa Awad writes. "When we open up the conversation about PPD we take away harmful assumptions about why it exists and can help address the issue from a multi-dimensional perspective," writes Awad.

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MuslimMatters
2/22/2019

The skin color of a child who is an adoption candidate should be kept confidential "unless social workers can establish a clear reason why sharing it would lead to the best adoptive outcome for the potential adoptee," social work professor Ronald Hall writes. Hall says studies confirm that it's less expensive to adopt black children, cites a study that said social workers gave preference to children with features that were more Caucasian, and asserts social workers may run afoul of the National Association of Social Workers code of ethics if they "accommodate a preference regarding skin color."

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The Conversation (US)
2/22/2019

A federal lawsuit arising from a white Texas family's adoption of a Navajo boy could decide the fate of a 1978 law designed to preserve the cultural heritage of Native American children. Challengers of the Indian Child Welfare Act argue that it deprives children of loving homes by placing too much emphasis on tribal identity in placements.

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The Atlantic online
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Indian Child Welfare
2/22/2019

Researchers who used PET found that sugar uptake changes between baseline and two weeks after the start of pertuzumab and trastuzumab treatment without chemotherapy yielded high sensitivity and very high negative predictive value in predicting treatment response among women with stage II or stage III ER-negative, HER2-positive breast cancer, with those having elevated sugar levels post-treatment likely to need chemotherapy. The findings in the Journal of Clinical Oncology may prompt better-targeted breast cancer treatments, but more studies are needed before widespread use of the PET scan biomarker, researcher Dr. Vered Stearns said.

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ScienceDaily
2/22/2019

The CMS approved LivaNova's vagus nerve stimulation therapy for treatment-resistant depression for Medicare coverage through the Coverage with Evidence Development framework when offered via an agency-approved trial, the company said. The decision also covers device replacement and may extend the trial to a potential longitudinal study.

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MassDevice (Boston)
2/22/2019

The collapse of Venezuela's health care system and the failure of government to sustain disease surveillance and public health programs have resulted in increases in cases of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, Chagas' disease, chikungunya, dengue and Zika virus. A review by international researchers in The Lancet Infectious Diseases said the spread of insect-borne diseases in Venezuela poses a health risk for the region.

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Reuters
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Malaria